2 months ago
6 months ago 8 months ago
8 months ago

"The Follow" by Wong Kar Wai for BMW

9 months ago

In The Mood for Doyle - Christopher Doyle is one of the best known and most acclaimed directors of photography in world cinema. Born in Australia, he sees himself as an Asian citizen rather than a Westerner. His artistic contribution to the films of Wong Kar-wai, Zhang Jimou and Fruit Chan films, among others, is indisputable. Filmed in DV and Super8, this documentary is a kind of wild and stylized road movie — from Bangkok to Hong Kong, via New York. The camera follows this eccentric and outrageous artist as he gives us his thoughts on his past and present work. From the recent sets of Invisible Waves by Thailand’s Pen ek Ratanaruang, and M. Night Shyamalan’s Lady in the Water, to the locations in Hong Kong where he shot some of his most famous pictures, such as In The Mood for Love and Dumplings, Chris Doyle talks about his cinematic fascination for Asian culture.

10 months ago
Kung fu, two simple words, signifying fall, rise, departing, and succession. A rise and crouch, fall back and scatter, reunion, counter attack, move forward. Originating in Foshan, spreading in the Northeast, to finally reside in Hong Kong. —The Grandmasters

Kung fu, two simple words, signifying fall, rise, departing, and succession. A rise and crouch, fall back and scatter, reunion, counter attack, move forward. Originating in Foshan, spreading in the Northeast, to finally reside in Hong Kong. —The Grandmasters

1 year ago

In the film’s final scene of Mr. Chow at the temple: a man, on his own, whispering into a notch in the rock wall, speaking secrets that we cannot hear but have no problem guessing. In that latter scene, Mr. Chow is spontaneously following up on a practice from an old legend in which people would climb mountains, whisper their secrets into a hole in a tree and then cover up the hole with mud to lock their secrets inside. The spontaneity of his action—he sees the hole and comes up with the idea—is a sign of how much he still thinks of Mrs. Chan, even though they have gone their separate ways.

Wong captures that scene from a variety of angles, each of them powerful in their own ways. Most memorable for me are two specific shots: one from far above Mr. Chow, as seen from the vantage point of a confused onlooker, which shows just how fully and unselfconsciously he commits himself to the exercise, and one from close up, near Mr. Chow’s hands, as if seen from the vantage point of the wall, which allows us to watch Mr. Chow’s jaw rising and falling as he whispers his secrets. I love those shots because they lay bare Mr. Chow’s deep feelings for Mrs. Chan, by showing the solemnity with which he takes part in this ritual, while also protecting the privacy of those feelings. We know all along that these characters love one another, but that scene and the scene of Mrs. Chan in the Singapore apartment suggest that we still might not understand the intensity or character of their bond. (via Slant Magazine)

1 year ago

Interview with Wong Kar-Wai about Chunking Express

1 year ago

“The Grandmaster” is said to be Wong Kar Wai’s most commercial film. It opened strong in China in January, making more than $50 million at the box office and is the director’s highest-grossing film. After multiple edits, “The Grandmaster” in its current version is screening at 120 minutes, though a four-hour version of the film is said to exist.

At the press conference for the film, the 56-year-old Wong said he’d had the idea the film since 1999, after seeing a Super 8 film of Ip Man taken three days before his death in 1972.  In the clip, the 79-year-old is in his pajamas, in his living room with cats and grandchildren watching as he demonstrates his art.  For a moment, with his back to the camera, he stops.  “It’s a very agonizing moment,” said Wong. 

“Either he’s too weak or he’s too tired to carry on. Or he simply forgot it.  And that’s the moment that really moves me.” (via)

1 year ago
In our last view of the Brigitte Lin Ching-hsia’s character in Chungking Express, Wong Kar-wai presents a jerky slow-motion shot of her leaving the crime scene and dodging out of the frame. It freezes on her, at a moment that yields a perversely unreadable image.
A shot of this frame would have been mud in the black-and-white pages of the book and probably not much better in the color pdf. I couldn’t imagine catching the faint reddish glint of the woman’s sunglasses.
This still comes from a 35mm print of the movie, and it is, of course, a lot more poetic than my snapshots, partly because it teases you about what’s in the frame. (via David Bordwell)

In our last view of the Brigitte Lin Ching-hsia’s character in Chungking Express, Wong Kar-wai presents a jerky slow-motion shot of her leaving the crime scene and dodging out of the frame. It freezes on her, at a moment that yields a perversely unreadable image.

A shot of this frame would have been mud in the black-and-white pages of the book and probably not much better in the color pdf. I couldn’t imagine catching the faint reddish glint of the woman’s sunglasses.

This still comes from a 35mm print of the movie, and it is, of course, a lot more poetic than my snapshots, partly because it teases you about what’s in the frame. (via David Bordwell)