2 years ago

“For 62 years, in what is now the world’s longest ongoing conflict, the ill-fed and ill-equipped people of Karen State, (locally called Kawtoolie), Burma have been fighting for an independent homeland against the ruling Burmese military government. The junta has been applying a brutal, systematic policy of murder, rape, forced labor and wholesale destruction of Karan villages. Working on assignment in Karan State for Men’s Journal in November 2010, I was enamored by the calm resilience of the Karen people, both soldiers and civilians, who all seem to possess a quiet determination, backed by their motto ‘never surrender.’ I decided to return in February 2011, to bring the face of the Karen people, and their highly under-reported struggle to survive against the brutal junta, to a greater audience in the hopes of affecting some positive change.” – Jason Florio

2 years ago 2 years ago
cotonblanc:
dries van noten

not in our namei-D magazine, the action issue, june 2003


the following section is dedicated to peace and a future that does   not rely on bombs, tanks and guns to solve the problems of the world.

the idea for this project started during fashion week in new york,   with tanks at heathrow, helicopters over manhattan and peace marches   planned across the world for the following saturday. it seemed that we   had to do something; that however small our contribution, we had to   stand up and be counted, to lend our voices to the growing consensus of   dissent – because the truth is that if we silent, it can only be   presumed that we acquiesce.

we wanted to be a conduit for creative people internationally who   disagree with war. so we sent out the following brief: ‘let us know your   views, your message, your image and your ideas in whatever way you  want  to. we suggest using a white shirt or t-shirt as a canvas, and  would  ask you to be photographed with it if you don’t mind, but you do  not  have to.’

cotonblanc:

dries van noten

not in our name
i-D magazine, the action issue, june 2003

the following section is dedicated to peace and a future that does not rely on bombs, tanks and guns to solve the problems of the world.

the idea for this project started during fashion week in new york, with tanks at heathrow, helicopters over manhattan and peace marches planned across the world for the following saturday. it seemed that we had to do something; that however small our contribution, we had to stand up and be counted, to lend our voices to the growing consensus of dissent – because the truth is that if we silent, it can only be presumed that we acquiesce.

we wanted to be a conduit for creative people internationally who disagree with war. so we sent out the following brief: ‘let us know your views, your message, your image and your ideas in whatever way you want to. we suggest using a white shirt or t-shirt as a canvas, and would ask you to be photographed with it if you don’t mind, but you do not have to.’

3 years ago

Two enlisted Marines face potential punishment for allegedly hazing a fellow Marine from California while their battalion was in Afghanistan, according to a report in the Marine Corps Times.
Lance Cpl. Harry Lew, 21, of Santa Clara committed suicide within hours of the rough treatment, the newspaper said.
Before putting a machine gun to his head, Lew left a note on his arm: “May hate me now, but in the long run this was the right choice. I’m sorry. My mom deserves the truth.”
The two other Marine lance corporals allegedly became angry when they found Lew asleep while assigned to stand guard on the night of April 2.
A sergeant told the lance corporals that “peers should correct peers,” according to an investigative report obtained by the newspaper.
The two lance corporals then ordered Lew to do pushups, crunches and other exercises, according to the report. One of the Marines stomped on Lew’s leg and another kicked dirt on him. Both allegedly berated him for sloppy performance.
The three were part of the Hawaii-based 2nd battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, assigned at the time to the Nawa district of Helmand province, long a Taliban stronghold.
One of the lance corporals faces an Article 32 — akin to a civilian preliminary hearing — on charges of cruelty and maltreatment. The other, the Marine Corps Times said, will face non-judicial punishment meted out by a superior officer.
In both cases, the process will take place at the Marine base in Hawaii.
Born and raised in Santa Clara, Lew graduated from Santa Clara High and attended Mission College for a year before enlisting. His parents, both immigrants, were shocked but proud of his decision to enlist. His aunt is Rep. Judy Chu (D-El Monte).
"When I dropped him off at the airport (before he deployed to Afghanistan), I remember telling him: ‘You take care. Don’t get yourself killed,’ " his father, Allen Lew, told The Times in April. "He just said: ‘OK,’ got his luggage and left."
Lew was buried in Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno. (via)

Two enlisted Marines face potential punishment for allegedly hazing a fellow Marine from California while their battalion was in Afghanistan, according to a report in the Marine Corps Times.

Lance Cpl. Harry Lew, 21, of Santa Clara committed suicide within hours of the rough treatment, the newspaper said.

Before putting a machine gun to his head, Lew left a note on his arm: “May hate me now, but in the long run this was the right choice. I’m sorry. My mom deserves the truth.”

The two other Marine lance corporals allegedly became angry when they found Lew asleep while assigned to stand guard on the night of April 2.

A sergeant told the lance corporals that “peers should correct peers,” according to an investigative report obtained by the newspaper.

The two lance corporals then ordered Lew to do pushups, crunches and other exercises, according to the report. One of the Marines stomped on Lew’s leg and another kicked dirt on him. Both allegedly berated him for sloppy performance.

The three were part of the Hawaii-based 2nd battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, assigned at the time to the Nawa district of Helmand province, long a Taliban stronghold.

One of the lance corporals faces an Article 32 — akin to a civilian preliminary hearing — on charges of cruelty and maltreatment. The other, the Marine Corps Times said, will face non-judicial punishment meted out by a superior officer.

In both cases, the process will take place at the Marine base in Hawaii.

Born and raised in Santa Clara, Lew graduated from Santa Clara High and attended Mission College for a year before enlisting. His parents, both immigrants, were shocked but proud of his decision to enlist. His aunt is Rep. Judy Chu (D-El Monte).

"When I dropped him off at the airport (before he deployed to Afghanistan), I remember telling him: ‘You take care. Don’t get yourself killed,’ " his father, Allen Lew, told The Times in April. "He just said: ‘OK,’ got his luggage and left."

Lew was buried in Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno. (via)

3 years ago
Nguyen Thi Li, aged 9, who lives in the Ngu Hanh Son district of Da Nang in Vietnam, suffers from disabilities believed to be caused by the defoliating chemical Agent Orange. During the Vietnam War, US forces sprayed Agent Orange over forests and farmland in an attempt to deprive Viet Cong guerrillas of cover and food. The dioxin compound used in the defoliant is a long-acting toxin that can be passed down genetically, so it is still having an impact forty years on. The Vietnam Red Cross estimates that some 150,000 Vietnamese children are disabled owing to their parents’ exposure to the dioxin. Symptoms range from diabetes and heart disease to physical and learning disabilities.
Ed Kashi speaks about the project:"I was in Danang, Vietnam to work on a short film about child victims of Agent Orange and, while shooting video, was confronted with this incredible moment where the light, composition, character and mood combined to present something magical, transcendent and ultimately beautiful in its essence. Yet, it also showed the ongoing effects of a war that ended 35 years ago. Nguyen Thi Ly, a 9 year old girl afflicted with the genetic defects associated with Agent Orange exposure, represents yet another generation of children in Vietnam who need care and support."

Nguyen Thi Li, aged 9, who lives in the Ngu Hanh Son district of Da Nang in Vietnam, suffers from disabilities believed to be caused by the defoliating chemical Agent Orange. During the Vietnam War, US forces sprayed Agent Orange over forests and farmland in an attempt to deprive Viet Cong guerrillas of cover and food. The dioxin compound used in the defoliant is a long-acting toxin that can be passed down genetically, so it is still having an impact forty years on. The Vietnam Red Cross estimates that some 150,000 Vietnamese children are disabled owing to their parents’ exposure to the dioxin. Symptoms range from diabetes and heart disease to physical and learning disabilities.

Ed Kashi speaks about the project:
"I was in Danang, Vietnam to work on a short film about child victims of Agent Orange and, while shooting video, was confronted with this incredible moment where the light, composition, character and mood combined to present something magical, transcendent and ultimately beautiful in its essence. Yet, it also showed the ongoing effects of a war that ended 35 years ago. Nguyen Thi Ly, a 9 year old girl afflicted with the genetic defects associated with Agent Orange exposure, represents yet another generation of children in Vietnam who need care and support."

3 years ago
Child in a rebel camp in the north-eastern Central African Republic. Photo by Pierre Holtz.

Child in a rebel camp in the north-eastern Central African Republic. Photo by Pierre Holtz.

3 years ago

Hitler Youth captured.

Hitler Youth captured.

3 years ago
 
The famous photo of the “Napalm girl” by Huynh Cong ‘Nick’ Ut of Associated Press was taken on June 8, 1972 with his Leica M2 and Leica Summicron 35/2 on a Kodak 400 ISO B&W film.
The 9-year old girl in the photo, Phan Thị Kim Phúc, survived her burnings from the napalm bombing after 14 months in the hospital. The photographer took her to the hospital before he delivered the film to AP. She later founded an organization to help children of war. On December 28, 2009, NPR broadcast her spoken essay, "The Long Road to Forgiveness," for the “This I Believe" series. 
The image won the Pulitzer Prize.

The famous photo of the “Napalm girl” by Huynh Cong ‘Nick’ Ut of Associated Press was taken on June 8, 1972 with his Leica M2 and Leica Summicron 35/2 on a Kodak 400 ISO B&W film.

The 9-year old girl in the photo, Phan Thị Kim Phúc, survived her burnings from the napalm bombing after 14 months in the hospital. The photographer took her to the hospital before he delivered the film to AP. She later founded an organization to help children of war. On December 28, 2009, NPR broadcast her spoken essay, "The Long Road to Forgiveness," for the “This I Believe" series. 

The image won the Pulitzer Prize.

3 years ago

The Army: Then and Now, 30”x40”, acrylic and oil on plywood, 2007 by Scott Waters.

The Army: Then and Now, 30”x40”, acrylic and oil on plywood, 2007 by Scott Waters.

3 years ago