1 week ago
NZABAMWITA: “I damaged and looted her property. I spent nine and a half years in jail. I had been educated to know good from evil before being released. And when I came home, I thought it would be good to approach the person to whom I did evil deeds and ask for her forgiveness. I told her that I would stand by her, with all the means at my disposal. My own father was involved in killing her children. When I learned that my parent had behaved wickedly, for that I profoundly begged her pardon, too.”
KAMPUNDU: “My husband was hiding, and men hunted him down and killed him on a Tuesday. The following Tuesday, they came back and killed my two sons. I was hoping that my daughters would be saved, but then they took them to my husband’s village and killed them and threw them in the latrine. I was not able to remove them from that hole. I knelt down and prayed for them, along with my younger brother, and covered the latrine with dirt. The reason I granted pardon is because I realized that I would never get back the beloved ones I had lost. I could not live a lonely life — I wondered, if I was ill, who was going to stay by my bedside, and if I was in trouble and cried for help, who was going to rescue me? I preferred to grant pardon.”
Portraits of Reconciliation

NZABAMWITA: “I damaged and looted her property. I spent nine and a half years in jail. I had been educated to know good from evil before being released. And when I came home, I thought it would be good to approach the person to whom I did evil deeds and ask for her forgiveness. I told her that I would stand by her, with all the means at my disposal. My own father was involved in killing her children. When I learned that my parent had behaved wickedly, for that I profoundly begged her pardon, too.”

KAMPUNDU: “My husband was hiding, and men hunted him down and killed him on a Tuesday. The following Tuesday, they came back and killed my two sons. I was hoping that my daughters would be saved, but then they took them to my husband’s village and killed them and threw them in the latrine. I was not able to remove them from that hole. I knelt down and prayed for them, along with my younger brother, and covered the latrine with dirt. The reason I granted pardon is because I realized that I would never get back the beloved ones I had lost. I could not live a lonely life — I wondered, if I was ill, who was going to stay by my bedside, and if I was in trouble and cried for help, who was going to rescue me? I preferred to grant pardon.”

Portraits of Reconciliation

1 month ago
Admiral Heiachiro Togo hoisted the Z flag aboard his flagship Mikasa immediately before engaging Admiral Rozhestvensky’s Russian Baltic Fleet at Tsushima Straits on May 27, 1905. The meaning of the signal is variously translated, but seems to have meant, in substance, “The fate of Imperial Japan hangs on this one battle; all hands will exert themselves and do their best.”
Apparently the flag Admiral Nagumo hoisted on the aircraft carrier Akagi on the night of December 6, 1941, when he judged that his fleet had achieved complete surprise over the US Navy, was the same actual flag flown aboard Akagi 36 years before. As every Japanese officer and sailor would have grown up being taught about Togo’s signal, this was a powerful inspiration which obviously had precisely the same meaning as that conveyed by Togo’s signal.

Admiral Heiachiro Togo hoisted the Z flag aboard his flagship Mikasa immediately before engaging Admiral Rozhestvensky’s Russian Baltic Fleet at Tsushima Straits on May 27, 1905. The meaning of the signal is variously translated, but seems to have meant, in substance, “The fate of Imperial Japan hangs on this one battle; all hands will exert themselves and do their best.”

Apparently the flag Admiral Nagumo hoisted on the aircraft carrier Akagi on the night of December 6, 1941, when he judged that his fleet had achieved complete surprise over the US Navy, was the same actual flag flown aboard Akagi 36 years before. As every Japanese officer and sailor would have grown up being taught about Togo’s signal, this was a powerful inspiration which obviously had precisely the same meaning as that conveyed by Togo’s signal.

8 months ago

"One man looks at a dying bird and thinks there’s nothing but unanswered pain, that death’s got the final word … Another man sees that same bird, feels the glory."

“Does our ruin benefit the earth, aid the grass to grow, and the sun to shine? Is this darkness in you too? Have you passed through this night?”

“Oh, my soul. Let me be in you now. Look out through my eyes. Look out at the things you made. All things shining.”

The Thin Red Line

9 months ago
nevver: World World Something
10 months ago

Mickey Mouse in Vietnam is a 16mm underground short movie. The director was Lee Savage, the producer and head designer was Milton Glaser. It features the Disney character Mickey Mouse being shipped to Vietnam during the war. Moments after arriving, he is shot dead. It was produced independently in 1969 and has a total running time of one minute. This film was lost for many years until April 22, 2013 when a YouTube user uploaded the video.

1 year ago
Surrender Speech by Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce
“I am tired of fighting.  Our chiefs are killed.  Looking Glass is dead.  Toohulhulsoteis is dead.  The old men are all dead.  It is the young men who say yes or no.  He who led the young men is dead.  It is cold and we have no blankets.  The little children are freezing to death.  My people, some of them, have run away to the hills and have no blankets, no food.  No one knows where they are–perhaps freezing to death.  I want to have time to look for my children and see how many I can find.  Maybe I shall find them among the dead.  Hear me, my chiefs.  I am tired.  My heart is sick and sad.  From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever.”

Surrender Speech by Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce

“I am tired of fighting.  Our chiefs are killed.  Looking Glass is dead.  Toohulhulsoteis is dead.  The old men are all dead.  It is the young men who say yes or no.  He who led the young men is dead.  It is cold and we have no blankets.  The little children are freezing to death.  My people, some of them, have run away to the hills and have no blankets, no food.  No one knows where they are–perhaps freezing to death.  I want to have time to look for my children and see how many I can find.  Maybe I shall find them among the dead.  Hear me, my chiefs.  I am tired.  My heart is sick and sad.  From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever.”

1 year ago

"in quiet rooms young girls are writing poetry" by David Rathman

"In quiet rooms young girls are writing poetry" is an artist’s book that reproduces David Rathman’s recent war-themed watercolors. The paintings depict tanks, planes, warships and helicopters. As with Rathman’s cowboy and car pieces, the imagery is paired with hand-written texts and legends.

Using “language in a paradoxical way to confront the imagery,” Rathman avoids a head-on collision with the “heaviness” of his subject. According to the artist, “There’s a lot of indirection and evasion going on; to see these aggressive menacing subjects twisting with uncertainty struck me as humorous and—in a sideways, minor way—profound.”

1 year ago
After Japan’s unconditional surrender in 1945, U.S. general Douglas MacArthur issued orders for the arrest of the first forty alleged war criminals, including Hideki_Tōjō. Soon, Tōjō’s home in Setagaya was besieged with newsmen and photographers. Inside, a doctor named Suzuki had marked Tōjō’s chest with charcoal to indicate the location of his heart. When American military police surrounded the house on 8 September 1945, they heard a muffled shot from inside. Major Paul Kraus and a group of military police burst in, followed by George Jones, a reporter for The New York Times. Tōjō had shot himself in the chest with a pistol, but despite shooting directly through the mark, the bullets missed his heart and penetrated his stomach. Now disarmed and with blood gushing out of his chest, Tōjō began to talk, and two Japanese reporters recorded his words. “I am very sorry it is taking me so long to die,” he murmured. “The Greater East Asia War was justified and righteous. I am very sorry for the nation and all the races of the Greater Asiatic powers. I wait for the righteous judgment of history. I wished to commit suicide but sometimes that fails.” (via Wikipedia)

After Japan’s unconditional surrender in 1945, U.S. general Douglas MacArthur issued orders for the arrest of the first forty alleged war criminals, including Hideki_Tōjō. Soon, Tōjō’s home in Setagaya was besieged with newsmen and photographers. Inside, a doctor named Suzuki had marked Tōjō’s chest with charcoal to indicate the location of his heart. When American military police surrounded the house on 8 September 1945, they heard a muffled shot from inside. Major Paul Kraus and a group of military police burst in, followed by George Jones, a reporter for The New York Times. Tōjō had shot himself in the chest with a pistol, but despite shooting directly through the mark, the bullets missed his heart and penetrated his stomach. Now disarmed and with blood gushing out of his chest, Tōjō began to talk, and two Japanese reporters recorded his words. “I am very sorry it is taking me so long to die,” he murmured. “The Greater East Asia War was justified and righteous. I am very sorry for the nation and all the races of the Greater Asiatic powers. I wait for the righteous judgment of history. I wished to commit suicide but sometimes that fails.” (via Wikipedia)

2 years ago
Vietnam Posters
2 years ago

“For 62 years, in what is now the world’s longest ongoing conflict, the ill-fed and ill-equipped people of Karen State, (locally called Kawtoolie), Burma have been fighting for an independent homeland against the ruling Burmese military government. The junta has been applying a brutal, systematic policy of murder, rape, forced labor and wholesale destruction of Karan villages. Working on assignment in Karan State for Men’s Journal in November 2010, I was enamored by the calm resilience of the Karen people, both soldiers and civilians, who all seem to possess a quiet determination, backed by their motto ‘never surrender.’ I decided to return in February 2011, to bring the face of the Karen people, and their highly under-reported struggle to survive against the brutal junta, to a greater audience in the hopes of affecting some positive change.” – Jason Florio