7 months ago
3Sixteen x HCR Travel Coffee Kit
8 months ago

bobaguys: We shot this when we visited Singapore. It’s called "Teh Tarik" which literally means pulled tea. When we tried it, it didn’t go over so well so for now, we’ll leave it to the pros.

1 year ago
itwonlast:
Yvon Chouinard: You remember the trips that lasted for a long time. The way people do trips now, they take, a week, they go to Europe—you don’t remember those trips very much. Or you go surfing in Indo for a week. But if you had to go over land or take a boat, it’s really different. That trip to Mount Fitz Roy lasted six months and in that time there were a lot of adventures on the way. Like sleeping on the ground in Guatemala and waking up to a gun to our heads—there was so much going on. It became a really important trip in my life. At the time I was thinking about starting this clothing company, and I wanted to make clothes for the conditions we found down there, which are like hurricane force winds and the evening with its orange look and its lenticular clouds. I thought, ‘This, this is what I want to make clothes for, I want to make clothes for Cape Horn and Patagonia.’ I came up with the idea for the logo (the skyline of Mt.Fitzroy looking west) . At the time, Patagonia was like Timbuktu, which is this mystical place. Everybody kind of knew where it was, but didn’t really.

itwonlast:

Yvon Chouinard: You remember the trips that lasted for a long time. The way people do trips now, they take, a week, they go to Europe—you don’t remember those trips very much. Or you go surfing in Indo for a week. But if you had to go over land or take a boat, it’s really different. That trip to Mount Fitz Roy lasted six months and in that time there were a lot of adventures on the way. Like sleeping on the ground in Guatemala and waking up to a gun to our heads—there was so much going on. It became a really important trip in my life. At the time I was thinking about starting this clothing company, and I wanted to make clothes for the conditions we found down there, which are like hurricane force winds and the evening with its orange look and its lenticular clouds. I thought, ‘This, this is what I want to make clothes for, I want to make clothes for Cape Horn and Patagonia.’ I came up with the idea for the logo (the skyline of Mt.Fitzroy looking west) . At the time, Patagonia was like Timbuktu, which is this mystical place. Everybody kind of knew where it was, but didn’t really.

1 year ago

Monocle’s first ever book, The Monocle Guide to Better Living, is an informative and entertaining collection of writing and recommendations from across the globe.

1 year ago
Tim Parks’s books on Italy have been hailed as “so vivid, so packed with delectable details, [they] serve as a more than decent substitute for the real thing” (Los Angeles Times Book Review). Now, in his first Italian travelogue in a decade, he delivers a charming and funny portrait of Italian ways by riding its trains from Verona to Milan, Rome to Palermo, and right down to the heel of Italy. Parks begins as any traveler might: “A train is a train is a train, isn’t it?” But soon he turns his novelist’s eye to the details, and as he journeys through majestic Milano Centrale station or on the newest high-speed rail line, he delivers a uniquely insightful portrait of Italy. Through memorable encounters with ordinary Italians—conductors and ticket collectors, priests and prostitutes, scholars and lovers, gypsies and immigrants—Parks captures what makes Italian life distinctive: an obsession with speed but an acceptance of slower, older ways; a blind eye toward brutal architecture amid grand monuments; and an undying love of a good argument and the perfect cappuccino. Italian Ways also explores how trains helped build Italy and how their development reflects Italians’ sense of themselves from Garibaldi to Mussolini to Berlusconi and beyond. Most of all, Italian Ways is an entertaining attempt to capture the essence of modern Italy. As Parks writes, “To see the country by train is to consider the crux of the essential Italian dilemma: Is Italy part of the modern world, or not?”
Italian Ways by Tim Parks

Tim Parks’s books on Italy have been hailed as “so vivid, so packed with delectable details, [they] serve as a more than decent substitute for the real thing” (Los Angeles Times Book Review). Now, in his first Italian travelogue in a decade, he delivers a charming and funny portrait of Italian ways by riding its trains from Verona to Milan, Rome to Palermo, and right down to the heel of Italy. Parks begins as any traveler might: “A train is a train is a train, isn’t it?” But soon he turns his novelist’s eye to the details, and as he journeys through majestic Milano Centrale station or on the newest high-speed rail line, he delivers a uniquely insightful portrait of Italy. Through memorable encounters with ordinary Italians—conductors and ticket collectors, priests and prostitutes, scholars and lovers, gypsies and immigrants—Parks captures what makes Italian life distinctive: an obsession with speed but an acceptance of slower, older ways; a blind eye toward brutal architecture amid grand monuments; and an undying love of a good argument and the perfect cappuccino. Italian Ways also explores how trains helped build Italy and how their development reflects Italians’ sense of themselves from Garibaldi to Mussolini to Berlusconi and beyond. Most of all, Italian Ways is an entertaining attempt to capture the essence of modern Italy. As Parks writes, “To see the country by train is to consider the crux of the essential Italian dilemma: Is Italy part of the modern world, or not?”

Italian Ways by Tim Parks

1 year ago
I want to go to there.

I want to go to there.

1 year ago

Singapore Girl is a consistent visual advertising slogan applied to depictions of stewardesses of Singapore Airlines (SIA) dressed in the distinctive “Sarong Kebaya” SIA uniform since 1972 and remains a prominent element of SIA’s marketing.

As part of efforts to build the image of the “Singapore Girl”, the airline runs a rigorous training program for cabin and flight crew. The airline’s repute, and the resulting prestige of the job has allowed it to be highly selective during its recruitment process as it receives numerous applications locally and from around the region. Singapore Airlines used to recruit only Singaporeans and Malaysians as cabin crew, but since 1995, in line with its global expansion, recruitment extended to other countries such as ChinaIndiaIndonesiaJapanKorea and Taiwan to minimise language barriers between cabin crew and travellers.

About 10% of applicants of each recruitment drive are successful and sent for training on their first steps to becoming a “Singapore Girl”.

Some of the strict rules and regulations for the crew from head to toe include:

  • The airline requires stewardesses and stewards to color their hair black or dark brown. Stewardesses or stewards cannot use highlights.
  • Stewardesses with long hair are to coil it into buns or French twists.
  • Stewards are to sport short hair above their collar lines and sideburns no longer than the ear lobes. Fringes cannot touch their eyebrows.
  • Eyebrows must be shaped, and cannot be fake, be it drawn-on or tattooed.
  • Eye shadow must be of the colour prescribed by the company - either blue or brown, depending on skin tone.
  • No fanciful, dangling earrings allowed; only studs or pearls.
  • Lipstick colour must be among the few shades of bright red prescribed by the company. Pink or plum shades are forbidden.
  • No chains and necklaces allowed.
  • Only simple bracelets and rings can be worn. Only small and simple watches can be worn.
  • A spare kebaya must be brought for every flight, including short, one-hour flights.
  • Nail polish must be of the bright red colour prescribed by the company. Nails should not be chipped.
  • Toenails must be of the bright red colour prescribed by the company. If toenails are unpainted, stockings must be worn as a substitute.
  • Safety shoes or covered sandals must be worn during take-off and landing. At other times, stewardesses should wear their batik slippers.
1 year ago
14,000 feet later, I reached summit. (at kota kinabalu)

14,000 feet later, I reached summit. (at kota kinabalu)

1 year ago
Headed to Singapore for the holidays…any tips?

Headed to Singapore for the holidays…any tips?

1 year ago