2 months ago
Incredibly Hot Sex With Hideous People
6 months ago
6 months ago

Posters for Lars Von Trier’s "Nymphomaniac"

6 months ago 6 months ago
fastcodesign:
Infographic of the Day: Mapping the United States by its porn searches
Apparently tastes in pornography are just as much a regional dish as kringles, poi, and Cincinnati.
More> Co.Design (via ilovecharts)

fastcodesign:

Infographic of the Day: Mapping the United States by its porn searches

Apparently tastes in pornography are just as much a regional dish as kringles, poi, and Cincinnati.

More> Co.Design (via ilovecharts)

7 months ago
There are many ways into the House of Holes, and they are all holes. Such is the logic that guides Nicholson Baker’s hilarious and extremely dirty “book of raunch,” “House of Holes,” and it’s more than enough. One woman enters this novel’s sex spa extraordinaire through an O-shape made by the fingers of a severed arm. Others fall through the hole in a golf green, or a pepper­mill. Somebody is funneled through a cocktail straw. Next thing, they all arrive at one of the loopier spots in literary memory — Plato’s Retreat by way of the Magic Mountain, or maybe the Oneida Community via Fantasy Island.
But really, the House of Holes is none of these places, because not even Mr. Roarke’s paradise boasts “pornsucker ships” (which fly over American cities and suck up the bad porn) or “crotchal transfers.”
Nor does it feature “mastur­boats” or “groanrooms” or a “squat line” organized for the pleasure of female guests. It’s doubtful that Hans Castorp, even at war, ever had to confront a “porn­monster,” a multi-endowed beast spawned from the toxic muck of a bad-porn dump site. If this sounds like a world dreamed up by a man with smut and silliness foremost on his mind, whose lewdness often saunters right into the realms of pure pornography, well, bingo. But since Baker is also one of the most consistently enticing writers of our time, you take the ride. Readers with a fondness for richly ridiculous diction, witty provocation and graphic sexual prose that celebrates desire, frailty and the comedy of life will not be disappointed.
House of Holes

There are many ways into the House of Holes, and they are all holes. Such is the logic that guides Nicholson Baker’s hilarious and extremely dirty “book of raunch,” “House of Holes,” and it’s more than enough. One woman enters this novel’s sex spa extraordinaire through an O-shape made by the fingers of a severed arm. Others fall through the hole in a golf green, or a pepper­mill. Somebody is funneled through a cocktail straw. Next thing, they all arrive at one of the loopier spots in literary memory — Plato’s Retreat by way of the Magic Mountain, or maybe the Oneida Community via Fantasy Island.

But really, the House of Holes is none of these places, because not even Mr. Roarke’s paradise boasts “pornsucker ships” (which fly over American cities and suck up the bad porn) or “crotchal transfers.”

Nor does it feature “mastur­boats” or “groanrooms” or a “squat line” organized for the pleasure of female guests. It’s doubtful that Hans Castorp, even at war, ever had to confront a “porn­monster,” a multi-endowed beast spawned from the toxic muck of a bad-porn dump site. If this sounds like a world dreamed up by a man with smut and silliness foremost on his mind, whose lewdness often saunters right into the realms of pure pornography, well, bingo. But since Baker is also one of the most consistently enticing writers of our time, you take the ride. Readers with a fondness for richly ridiculous diction, witty provocation and graphic sexual prose that celebrates desire, frailty and the comedy of life will not be disappointed.

House of Holes

7 months ago
A man can sleep around, no questions asked, but if a woman makes 19 or 20 mistakes she’s a tramp. Cite Arrow Joan Rivers
8 months ago

Tyrannosaurus Sex: An excerpt from the documentary of the same name featuring how T. REX may have had sex.

9 months ago 9 months ago

Wilt Chamberlain’s five-sided room, its ‘floor’ a circular water bed, eight feet in diameter, covered with French black rabbit fur. Custom wedge sofas in purple velvet fill space from bed to walls. Purple velvet covers the wall and the ceiling which is lit with tiny bulbs like stars. A timed light bounces a spectrum of colors around the room giving an outer-space atmosphere to the whole thing.

Although shy and insecure as a teenager, adult Chamberlain became well-known for his womanizing. As his lawyer Seymour “Sy” Goldberg put it: “Some people collect stamps, Wilt collected women.” Swedish Olympic high jumper Annette Tånnander, who met him when he was 40 and she 19, remembers him as a pick-up artist who was extremely confident yet respectful: “I think Wilt hit on everything that moved…[but] he never was bad or rude.” Many of Chamberlain’s personal friends testified that he once had 23 women in 10 days, had no problems organizing a threesome (or more), and particularly enjoyed a TV skit on the show In Living Color in which a mother and her daughter approach a Vietnam Wall-like list of women who slept with him, both of them pointing out that their names are on it, as well as a 1991 Saturday Night Live sketch where MC Hammer played Chamberlain in “Remembrances of Love”, where Chamberlain spoofs a soap opera with romances with women that are usually over in five minutes. However, Los Angeles Times columnist David Shaw claimed that during a dinner with Shaw and his wife, Chamberlain was “rude and sexist toward his own date, as he usually was,” adding that at one point Chamberlain left the table to get the phone number of an attractive woman at a nearby table.

According to Rod Roddewig, a contemporary of Wilt’s, the 20,000 number was created when he and Chamberlain were staying in Chamberlain’s penthouse in Honolulu during the mid-eighties. He and Chamberlain stayed at the penthouse for 10 days, over the course of which he recorded everything on his Daytimer. For every time Chamberlain went to bed with a different girl he put a check in his daytimer. After those 10 days there were 23 checks in the book, which would be rate of 2.3 women per day. He divided that number in half, to be conservative and correcting for degrees of variation. He then multiplied that number by the number of days he had been alive at the time minus 15 years. That was how the 20,000 number came into existence.

In a 1999 interview shortly before his death, Chamberlain regretted not having explained the sexual climate at the time of his escapades, and warned other men who admired him for it, closing with the words: “With all of you men out there who think that having a thousand different ladies is pretty cool, I have learned in my life I’ve found out that having one woman a thousand different times is much more satisfying.” Chamberlain also acknowledged he never came close to marrying, and had no intention of raising any children.

Cherry believes that Chamberlain’s extreme sex drive was fueled by the female rejection he had experienced as a teenager, causing him to overcompensate. Although his life was highly promiscuous, his lifelong friend and on-and-off girlfriend, Lynda Huey, eleven years his junior, said: “He had an inability of combining friendship and sexuality.” Shaw added: “Wilt never liked to admit a weakness … [but] you cannot be married and be Superman … you cannot appear invulnerable to your mate.” (via Wikipedia)