12 months ago
If you want to build a ship, don’t gather people together to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather, teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea. Cite Arrow Saint Exupéry
1 year ago
Margaret Durow
1 year ago
“Squid marinated in lemongrass and lime and chili flakes. Slices of salty haloumi cheese and lamb chops and sausages from Nicos, our local Greek Cypriot butcher…. We’d marinate a leg of lamb for two days in a mix of yogurt, almonds, pistachios, lots of spices, mint, and green chilies…. We’d buy greengages in August. Often they were perfect, not too yielding, but not unripe.”

The book in which the passage above appears contains other passages that speak of times in the garden, trips taken with family, children learning from their parents and vice versa, and moments of laughter and joy. In most books, these evocations of summertime ease and sweet familial conviviality would be a pleasure.
In Sonali Deraniyagala’s memoir, “Wave,” they are among the most difficult things I’ve ever read. The reason: “Wave” is about Deraniyagala’s husband, her parents, and her two sons, aged seven and five, all of whom died in a single morning in December, 2004, when the tsunami hit the resort where they were holidaying in Sri Lanka. Deraniyagala herself was found spinning around in circles and almost deranged in a swirl of mud after the water receded. “Wave” is her account of that day, and of the years that followed. (via The New Yorker)

“Squid marinated in lemongrass and lime and chili flakes. Slices of salty haloumi cheese and lamb chops and sausages from Nicos, our local Greek Cypriot butcher…. We’d marinate a leg of lamb for two days in a mix of yogurt, almonds, pistachios, lots of spices, mint, and green chilies…. We’d buy greengages in August. Often they were perfect, not too yielding, but not unripe.”

The book in which the passage above appears contains other passages that speak of times in the garden, trips taken with family, children learning from their parents and vice versa, and moments of laughter and joy. In most books, these evocations of summertime ease and sweet familial conviviality would be a pleasure.

In Sonali Deraniyagala’s memoir, “Wave,” they are among the most difficult things I’ve ever read. The reason: “Wave” is about Deraniyagala’s husband, her parents, and her two sons, aged seven and five, all of whom died in a single morning in December, 2004, when the tsunami hit the resort where they were holidaying in Sri Lanka. Deraniyagala herself was found spinning around in circles and almost deranged in a swirl of mud after the water receded. “Wave” is her account of that day, and of the years that followed. (via The New Yorker)

1 year ago
Ray Gascoigne, ship in a bottle builder. (via Doobybrain)

Ray Gascoigne, ship in a bottle builder. (via Doobybrain)

1 year ago
Anguilla Wave
1 year ago

Went sailing in the bay.

2 years ago
Emma Mærsk - At nearly 400 meters in length, the Emma is the longest container ship in the world. Besides being the longest, she also has the world’s largest diesel engine producing nearly 110,000 horsepower. She carries over 11,000 containers from China to Europe every seven weeks, with stops in Africa and the Middle East on her way. Emma’s first captain, Henrik Solmer, said that piloting her is a fantastic feeling and “what younger people would say is cool.”

Emma Mærsk - At nearly 400 meters in length, the Emma is the longest container ship in the world. Besides being the longest, she also has the world’s largest diesel engine producing nearly 110,000 horsepower. She carries over 11,000 containers from China to Europe every seven weeks, with stops in Africa and the Middle East on her way. Emma’s first captain, Henrik Solmer, said that piloting her is a fantastic feeling and “what younger people would say is cool.”

2 years ago
2 years ago

Shipwreckers, by Tomasz Gudzowaty

Since the 1970s, ninety-five percent of the 700 ships being decommissioned each year end their lives in India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. Most of these ships go to the Indian shipyard in Alang, but the true giants go to the Chittagong shipyard in Bangladesh. There are no docks, no concrete piers, no scaffolding, no cranes. In reality, it hardly qualifies as a shipyard at all. But despite its rough exterior, this beach is a thriving work zone that oversees the dismantling of about 70 ships a year. A worn out ship still in running shape is worth millions, yielding an average value of 110 to 150 dollars per ton. These ships are the sole source of raw materials for the metallurgical industry of Bangladesh, providing steel for construction, a huge benefit for a country devoid of natural resources. The shipyard’s owners are Chittagong businessmen, often linked to the steel industry. They seldom visit the beach in person, entrusting direct management to contracted specialists, who hire and manage swarms of workers to dismantle the ships. There are between 25 to 100 thousand of these workers on any given day. But the job is very dangerous. They use outdated and hazardous technologies to break up the ships and are paid very little to do so. But the Chittagong shipyard workers endure with surprising dignity, calm, and perseverance. They can provide for their entire families through this work. And despite the current world economic crisis, the ship wrecking industry in the Gulf of Bengal is still thriving.

2 years ago
MV Cougar Ace