7 months ago
1 year ago
Comme 3 Eau de Toilette
An imaginary flower: the flower you want it to be, the flower in your dreams. A new rose, incandescent, electric, opalescent.

Comme 3 Eau de Toilette

An imaginary flower: the flower you want it to be, the flower in your dreams. A new rose, incandescent, electric, opalescent.

1 year ago
At the age of twelve, Coco Chanel was handed over to the care of nuns, and for the next six years spent a stark, disciplined existence in a convent orphanage, Aubazine, founded in the twelfth century. From her earliest days at Aubazine, the number five had potent associations for Chanel. Aubazine had been founded by Cistercians, a Catholic order who placed great emphasis on numerology. The number five was especially esteemed as signifying the pure embodiment of a thing, its spirit, its mystic meaning. The paths that led Chanel to the cathedral for daily prayer were laid out in circular patterns repeating the number five.
Her affinity for the number five co-mingled with the abbey gardens, and by extension the lush surrounding hillsides abounding with cistus, a five-petal rose. Cistercians, an ancient monastic order of Catholicism, derived the name of their order from this flower.
In 1920, when presented with small glass vials of scent numbered 1–5 and 20–24, for her assessment, she chose the sample composition contained in the fifth vial. Chanel told her master perfumer, Ernest Beaux, whom she had commissioned to develop a fragrance with modern innovations: “I present my dress collections on the fifth of May, the fifth month of the year and so we will let this sample number five keep the name it has already, it will bring good luck.”
Chanel N°5

At the age of twelve, Coco Chanel was handed over to the care of nuns, and for the next six years spent a stark, disciplined existence in a convent orphanage, Aubazine, founded in the twelfth century. From her earliest days at Aubazine, the number five had potent associations for Chanel. Aubazine had been founded by Cistercians, a Catholic order who placed great emphasis on numerology. The number five was especially esteemed as signifying the pure embodiment of a thing, its spirit, its mystic meaning. The paths that led Chanel to the cathedral for daily prayer were laid out in circular patterns repeating the number five.

Her affinity for the number five co-mingled with the abbey gardens, and by extension the lush surrounding hillsides abounding with cistus, a five-petal rose. Cistercians, an ancient monastic order of Catholicism, derived the name of their order from this flower.

In 1920, when presented with small glass vials of scent numbered 1–5 and 20–24, for her assessment, she chose the sample composition contained in the fifth vial. Chanel told her master perfumer, Ernest Beaux, whom she had commissioned to develop a fragrance with modern innovations: “I present my dress collections on the fifth of May, the fifth month of the year and so we will let this sample number five keep the name it has already, it will bring good luck.”

Chanel N°5

2 years ago
Modeled after the scent of the Japanese Hinoki cypress used in spiritual and spa arrangements, namely the Hinoki wood soaking bath, the scent is reminiscent of cedar.

Modeled after the scent of the Japanese Hinoki cypress used in spiritual and spa arrangements, namely the Hinoki wood soaking bath, the scent is reminiscent of cedar.

2 years ago
…synthesizes natural grassy notes for a cool, classic, earthy scent. Known for its tranquil and restorative energy, vetiver is a clean, fresh and comfortable scent. With fruit and citrus at the top, clove leaf at the middle, and cedarwood and vetiver at its dry down.

…synthesizes natural grassy notes for a cool, classic, earthy scent. Known for its tranquil and restorative energy, vetiver is a clean, fresh and comfortable scent. With fruit and citrus at the top, clove leaf at the middle, and cedarwood and vetiver at its dry down.

2 years ago
Monocle x Comme des Garcons Scent Two: Laurel: Under the strong spicy and aromatic notes of laurel and pepper the new Monocle fragrance hides a very warm, woody and ambery background. Here you might recognize classic woody notes like cedar molecules, patchouli, a light incense note, dry amber (maybe trimofix). The top note is dominated by aromatic herbs and a great amount of pepper and other spices (bay, clove, nutmeg ?). A very small rose almost fruity-plum (damascone type) is blooming behind the laurel - cypress forest.

Monocle x Comme des Garcons Scent Two: Laurel: Under the strong spicy and aromatic notes of laurel and pepper the new Monocle fragrance hides a very warm, woody and ambery background. Here you might recognize classic woody notes like cedar molecules, patchouli, a light incense note, dry amber (maybe trimofix). The top note is dominated by aromatic herbs and a great amount of pepper and other spices (bay, clove, nutmeg ?). A very small rose almost fruity-plum (damascone type) is blooming behind the laurel - cypress forest.

2 years ago
Holygrace: Bergamot, Purple ginger, Pink pepper, Cardamom, Jasmine, Broom, Red Pimento, Vanilla, Amber, Vetyver, Styrax 

HolygraceBergamot, Purple ginger, Pink pepper, Cardamom, Jasmine, Broom, Red Pimento, Vanilla, Amber, Vetyver, Styrax 

3 years ago
Waka Flocka Flame cologne *deceased*

Waka Flocka Flame cologne *deceased*

3 years ago


The designer-artist Tobias Wong, who passed away in 2010, thought of himself, more than anything, as an observer. With a clever wit and ingenious clarity, he honed in on the icons, obsessions and desires of contemporary culture and appropriated them in objects that are both resonant and beautiful. One of his last concepts was The New York Times candle. Within the current fascination with scents and, especially, experimental scents, Wong proposed producing a candle with the fragrance of newsprint inspired by the New York Times, an institution he greatly admired and with which he had a longstanding relationship. This project was never actualized.
The partners at Bondtoo have realized his Times of New York candle in a limited editon of 1000.

The designer-artist Tobias Wong, who passed away in 2010, thought of himself, more than anything, as an observer. With a clever wit and ingenious clarity, he honed in on the icons, obsessions and desires of contemporary culture and appropriated them in objects that are both resonant and beautiful. One of his last concepts was The New York Times candle. Within the current fascination with scents and, especially, experimental scents, Wong proposed producing a candle with the fragrance of newsprint inspired by the New York Times, an institution he greatly admired and with which he had a longstanding relationship. This project was never actualized.

The partners at Bondtoo have realized his Times of New York candle in a limited editon of 1000.

3 years ago
CB I HATE PERFUME: In the Library
"I love books, particularly old ones. I cannot pass a second hand bookshop and rarely come away without at least one additional volume. I now have quite a collection… Whenever I read, the start of the journey is always opening the book and breathing deeply. Don’t you find there are few things more wonderful than the smell of a much-loved book? Newly printed books certainly smell very different from older ones. The ink is so crisp. I’ve also noticed that books from different periods & different countries also have very different smells.And then there are the scents of different bindings: leather is marvelous of course but I find a peculiar pleasure in musty worn clothbound books as well. Perhaps just a hint of mildew… The main note in this scent was copied from one of my favorite books - I happened to find a signed first edition of this novel a few years ago in London. I was more than a little excited because there were only ever a hundred in the first place!” -Christopher Brosius, founder/nose, CB I hate perfume A warm blend of English novels, Russian & Moroccan leather bindings, worn cloth and a hint of wood polish.
CB I HATE PERFUME: Under the Arbor
One of the most subtle scents we’ve had the pleasure to add to our ever-expanding arsenal here in the Blackbird Apothecary, Under the Arbor conjures memories of resting and relaxing underneath classically serene grape arbors. The moss is predominantly green, although there’s something there that creates a noticeable warm blanket starting with the first sniff. Light wood accents dance around while earth notes create a formidable foundation for the dirty fragrance. All the while, grape notes from the crushed grape leaves begin more on the greener side and sweeten dramatically as they open up. Soft, nostalgic, and as light as the beads of water found on the plants themselves, Under the Arbor is a perfect Spring scent for the fragrance enthusiast that wants to try something a little different. 
Notes: crushed grape leaves, weathered wood, green moss, cool earth 
(Editor’s note: These are the two bottles of cologne I wear, infrequently at that. I guess I just like the concept more than anything. The CdG Monocole scents smell good though, maybe those are next. Who doesn’t want to kiss a tree?) 

CB I HATE PERFUME: In the Library

"I love books, particularly old ones. I cannot pass a second hand bookshop and rarely come away without at least one additional volume. I now have quite a collection… 

Whenever I read, the start of the journey is always opening the book and breathing deeply. Don’t you find there are few things more wonderful than the smell of a much-loved book? Newly printed books certainly smell very different from older ones. The ink is so crisp. I’ve also noticed that books from different periods & different countries also have very different smells.

And then there are the scents of different bindings: leather is marvelous of course but I find a peculiar pleasure in musty worn clothbound books as well. Perhaps just a hint of mildew… 

The main note in this scent was copied from one of my favorite books - I happened to find a signed first edition of this novel a few years ago in London. I was more than a little excited because there were only ever a hundred in the first place!” -Christopher Brosius, founder/nose, CB I hate perfume 

A warm blend of English novels, Russian & Moroccan leather bindings, worn cloth and a hint of wood polish.

CB I HATE PERFUME: Under the Arbor

One of the most subtle scents we’ve had the pleasure to add to our ever-expanding arsenal here in the Blackbird Apothecary, Under the Arbor conjures memories of resting and relaxing underneath classically serene grape arbors. The moss is predominantly green, although there’s something there that creates a noticeable warm blanket starting with the first sniff. Light wood accents dance around while earth notes create a formidable foundation for the dirty fragrance. All the while, grape notes from the crushed grape leaves begin more on the greener side and sweeten dramatically as they open up. Soft, nostalgic, and as light as the beads of water found on the plants themselves, Under the Arbor is a perfect Spring scent for the fragrance enthusiast that wants to try something a little different. 

Notes: crushed grape leaves, weathered wood, green moss, cool earth 

(Editor’s note: These are the two bottles of cologne I wear, infrequently at that. I guess I just like the concept more than anything. The CdG Monocole scents smell good though, maybe those are next. Who doesn’t want to kiss a tree?)