1 year ago
wanderingwanderingstar:
“Here’s a great rule of thumb: until you create something yourself and then actually ship it, try to first find the positive in the products around you. Those products are the result of someone’s passion, hard work and innate genius. When we compare them to our own twisted, entitlement-driven expectations, we do nothing but insult their creators.
Shipping something is difficult. Shipping something is like setting a platter of precious glassware on the edge of a razor-thin knife. Shipping is an action that flirts with risk and failure. But it is an action that should be applauded rather than attacked.
We can trash an app because of the color of its icon and use powerful words like “hate” and lambast the decisions of the developers as “stupid” or “wrong”. But in doing so we ignore the multitude of positive aspects and elements that make the app worth buying and using. We, the generation of armchair developers and silver-spoon cry-babies. Shame on us.
We might be free to speak our mind, but we also need to grow up and take responsibility for the effect our words can have on others. Our entitlement needs to be taken out back and put down like Ol’ Yeller. No developer, musician or tech company is responsible for granting our every wish and desire, no matter how much we want it.
Stop moaning. Please. Just stop.”
http://bit.ly/RAlLCt

wanderingwanderingstar:

Here’s a great rule of thumb: until you create something yourself and then actually ship it, try to first find the positive in the products around you. Those products are the result of someone’s passion, hard work and innate genius. When we compare them to our own twisted, entitlement-driven expectations, we do nothing but insult their creators.

Shipping something is difficult. Shipping something is like setting a platter of precious glassware on the edge of a razor-thin knife. Shipping is an action that flirts with risk and failure. But it is an action that should be applauded rather than attacked.

We can trash an app because of the color of its icon and use powerful words like “hate” and lambast the decisions of the developers as “stupid” or “wrong”. But in doing so we ignore the multitude of positive aspects and elements that make the app worth buying and using. We, the generation of armchair developers and silver-spoon cry-babies. Shame on us.

We might be free to speak our mind, but we also need to grow up and take responsibility for the effect our words can have on others. Our entitlement needs to be taken out back and put down like Ol’ Yeller. No developer, musician or tech company is responsible for granting our every wish and desire, no matter how much we want it.

Stop moaning. Please. Just stop.”

http://bit.ly/RAlLCt

1 year ago
You need to remove from your life the day-to-day problems that absorb most people for meaningful parts of their day. “You’ll see I wear only gray or blue suits,” he said. “I’m trying to pare down decisions. I don’t want to make decisions about what I’m eating or wearing. Because I have too many other decisions to make.” He mentioned research that shows the simple act of making decisions degrades one’s ability to make further decisions. It’s why shopping is so exhausting. “You need to focus your decision-making energy. You need to routinize yourself. You can’t be going through the day distracted by trivia. Cite Arrow Obama’s Way
Anything less would be uncivilized.
The BC Corporate Story, 1997
2 years ago
2 years ago
The art of war teaches us to rely not on the likelihood of the enemy’s not coming, but on our own readiness to receive him; not on the chance of his not attacking, but rather on the fact that we have made our position unassailable. Cite Arrow The Art of War by Sun Tzu
2 years ago 2 years ago
Getting Final Cut

buzz:

If I had to identify a theme in my career thus far, it would probably be that I’m on a lifelong search for ways to build things I am passionate about, in ways I can be proud of, with people I respect and am respected by, without sacrificing my integrity. At this point I’ve been a large company employee (Apple and others), a bootstrapped indie developer (PodWorks, Birdfeed), and a part of both early stage and maturing startups (Square, Tumblr). Each of these phases in my career has held its own particular joys and frustrations, but looking back, the efforts that have brought me the most consistent personal satisfaction and produced the results I was most proud of have undoubtedly been the ones where I’ve had “final cut,” to borrow the filmmaking term.

As David Lynch explains in his book “Catching the Big Fish,” having final cut is very important in creative projects:

The filmmaker should decide on every single element, every single word, every single sound, every single thing going down that highway through time. Otherwise, it won’t hold together. The film may suck, but at least you made it suck on your own.

Lynch further explains how frustrating it can be not to have final cut on your work:

When I made Dune, I didn’t have final cut. It was a huge, huge sadness, because I felt I had sold out, and on top of that, the film was a failure at the box office. If you do what you believe in and have a failure, that’s one thing: you can still live with yourself. But if you don’t, it’s like dying twice. It’s very, very painful.

In the past few years, I’ve been lucky to be part of two exciting young companies, Square and Tumblr, during key times in their development. I’ve been privileged to work with some of the industry’s most talented people on products that have had a real impact on the world. I’ve learned a great deal in the process. But after several years as an employee, building other people’s products their way, I feel it’s high time to do my own thing—and have final cut—once again.

Optimizing for final cut isn’t an easy path, of course, as many a cinematic auteur has learned. Birdfeed, my last trip down this road, was, at times, enormously stressful and difficult. But I’ve learned a lot since those days, and this time around I’ll have more help.

2 years ago

howtotalktogirlsatparties: Eddie Huang gives his “TED Talk”.

2 years ago