2 weeks ago
Before the advent of photography, Japanese fishermen created a novel technique for documenting their catch. Gyotaku is a form of printing that creates accurate renditions through a relief printing process. Rubbing sumi ink onto the body of a fish, and then gently pressing rice paper onto it and peeling it away will net an impression of the fish—distinct enough to note the shape and size of the species as well as the subtle patterns and textures of scales, fins, and gills. 
Dating back to the 1800s, original gyotaku prints were minimal in their appearance—made only in black ink without embellishment of texture, color, or added elements. The emphasis of these early prints was to prove the size and species of the fisherman’s “trophy fish” and to record this permanently. It was not until later when gyotaku became an art form that composition and color were considered.
Gyotaku is still widely used today in Japan and other coastal communities. Often in restaurant signage, this technique allows chefs to advertise their seafood specials with immediacy and honesty. Traditionally, the fish is printed with non-toxic ink allowing it to be cleaned and prepared as a meal after the printing process has been completed. The natural precision of gyotaku offers a pure form of graphic clarity—its simplicity demonstrates detached documentation yet highlights the personal achievement of the proud fisherman.

Before the advent of photography, Japanese fishermen created a novel technique for documenting their catch. Gyotaku is a form of printing that creates accurate renditions through a relief printing process. Rubbing sumi ink onto the body of a fish, and then gently pressing rice paper onto it and peeling it away will net an impression of the fish—distinct enough to note the shape and size of the species as well as the subtle patterns and textures of scales, fins, and gills. 

Dating back to the 1800s, original gyotaku prints were minimal in their appearance—made only in black ink without embellishment of texture, color, or added elements. The emphasis of these early prints was to prove the size and species of the fisherman’s “trophy fish” and to record this permanently. It was not until later when gyotaku became an art form that composition and color were considered.

Gyotaku is still widely used today in Japan and other coastal communities. Often in restaurant signage, this technique allows chefs to advertise their seafood specials with immediacy and honesty. Traditionally, the fish is printed with non-toxic ink allowing it to be cleaned and prepared as a meal after the printing process has been completed. The natural precision of gyotaku offers a pure form of graphic clarity—its simplicity demonstrates detached documentation yet highlights the personal achievement of the proud fisherman.

5 months ago
DAZED
10 months ago
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Fully Booked
1 year ago
Upcoming The New Yorker cover.

Upcoming The New Yorker cover.

1 year ago

 i-D covers featuring Jourdan Dunn

1 year ago
Kindling Quarterly, a magazine on fatherhood. Just in time for Father’s Day.

Kindling Quarterly, a magazine on fatherhood. Just in time for Father’s Day.

1 year ago

Since the brand’s inception in 1969, founder Rei Kawakubo has applied a highly particular vision to every aspect of Comme des Garçons. Kawakubo not only reinvented ideas of what fashion and beauty could be, but also extended this to interior, packaging, furniture and graphic design. The company’s provocative publications and printed material presented an entirely new way to communicate the brands direction. They worked on a conceptual level by forming associations with artists and designers not directly involved with the fashion industry. In these avant-garde publications the clothes took a backseat whilst contributions from artists and designers such as Gilbert and George, Fischli and Weiss, Kishin Shinoyama, Louise Nevelson and The Boyle Family took centre stage. This intimate linking of fashion and contemporary art means all the Comme des Garçons publications are full of clever visual cues which demonstrate the same deconstructive nature as that seen within the clothes themselves.

LN-CC has gathered an array of Comme des Garçons publications and printed matter which celebrate the single-minded and enigmatic approach to their many projects.

1 year ago

Frankie is a national bi-monthly based in Australia, aimed at modern and sophisticated women. Frankie is dedicated to celebrating music, fashion, art, craft, photography, and pop culture’s quirkier aspects.

1 year ago
(via ohwrd)

(via ohwrd)