4 months ago
11 months ago
Two-Stroke
1 year ago
Throughout the 1950s, Charles Brittin was the unofficial house photographer for the Beat community that coalesced around the artist Wallace Berman. Brittin settled in Venice Beach, California, in 1951, and his beach shack became a hangout for the Berman circle, which included actors Dean Stockwell and Dennis Hopper, artist John Altoon, curator Walter Hopps and poet David Meltzer, among many others. A self-taught photographer, Brittin was working as a mailman at the time, and spent much of his free time wandering the streets with a camera; he came to know Venice intimately, and his pictures of the town are freighted with a hushed beauty and forlorn sweetness. In the early 1960s the focus of Brittin’s life shifted dramatically when he became involved with the civil rights movement. “I suddenly realized I was compelled to do something,” Brittin recalls, “because the times demanded it.” As a photographer for the Congress of Racial Equality, Brittin documented the dramatic non-violent protests that occurred throughout Southern California, and made a courageous trip to the deep South, in 1965, to assist with the registration of black voters. As the 60s progressed he documented the antiwar movement, and by the end of the decade was devoting most of his time to the Black Panther Party. 
Charles Brittin: West and South

Throughout the 1950s, Charles Brittin was the unofficial house photographer for the Beat community that coalesced around the artist Wallace Berman. Brittin settled in Venice Beach, California, in 1951, and his beach shack became a hangout for the Berman circle, which included actors Dean Stockwell and Dennis Hopper, artist John Altoon, curator Walter Hopps and poet David Meltzer, among many others. A self-taught photographer, Brittin was working as a mailman at the time, and spent much of his free time wandering the streets with a camera; he came to know Venice intimately, and his pictures of the town are freighted with a hushed beauty and forlorn sweetness. In the early 1960s the focus of Brittin’s life shifted dramatically when he became involved with the civil rights movement. “I suddenly realized I was compelled to do something,” Brittin recalls, “because the times demanded it.” As a photographer for the Congress of Racial Equality, Brittin documented the dramatic non-violent protests that occurred throughout Southern California, and made a courageous trip to the deep South, in 1965, to assist with the registration of black voters. As the 60s progressed he documented the antiwar movement, and by the end of the decade was devoting most of his time to the Black Panther Party.¬†

Charles Brittin: West and South

1 year ago
1 year ago
Thinking about buying a stock Honda Grom and having Deus Ex Machina work their magic on it. It’s a tiny bike…reminds me of the 70’s monkey bikes. I wonder if you can attach a surfboard rack to the side of it?

Thinking about buying a stock¬†Honda Grom and having Deus Ex Machina work their magic on it. It’s a tiny bike…reminds me of the 70’s monkey bikes. I wonder if you can attach a surfboard rack to the side of it?

1 year ago
Deus Drovers Dog SR400 Custom

Deus Drovers Dog SR400 Custom

1 year ago
1 year ago
1 year ago
The Much Much Go
1 year ago