5 days ago
Popeye Syndrome - An acquired condition of older men who perform heavy work with their arms, resulting in a Popeye-like enlargement of their forearms, which are relatively larger than their upper arms; muscular hypertrophy within fibrous forearm compartments results in compression of the brachial artery with ischaemic forearm fatigue and paresthesias

Popeye SyndromeAn acquired condition of older men who perform heavy work with their arms, resulting in a Popeye-like enlargement of their forearms, which are relatively larger than their upper arms; muscular hypertrophy within fibrous forearm compartments results in compression of the brachial artery with ischaemic forearm fatigue and paresthesias

9 months ago

Kevin Breel on depression

10 months ago
The Withings scale measures your weight, body fat %, pulse rate, temperature, and CO2 levels in your home.

It connects to the wifi in your home and communicates with the Withings app on your iPhone and Android. You never have to connect anything to anything. The data flows over the air from scale to phone. The app provides a timeline of your key stats and gives you goal settings for them.

The Withings scale measures your weight, body fat %, pulse rate, temperature, and CO2 levels in your home.

It connects to the wifi in your home and communicates with the Withings app on your iPhone and Android. You never have to connect anything to anything. The data flows over the air from scale to phone. The app provides a timeline of your key stats and gives you goal settings for them.

1 year ago 1 year ago
This underground facility is situated within the Solotvyno salt mine near a small Ukrainian village of the same name, close to the Romanian border. It was opened during Soviet times in the 1970s, and operates alongside the Ukrainian State Allergy Hospital which is also located nearby.
The therapy which takes place at Solotvyno is based on a method known as Speleo-therapy, an alternative therapy for asthma and other respiratory diseases. This therapy was discovered in Poland in the 1950s when it was noticed that salt mine workers rarely suffered from tuberculosis. Scientists found that the salt-permeated air of the working salt mine helped to dissolve phlegm in the bronchial tubes and also killed the micro-organisms which caused infections – and that this greatly helped patients who were undertaking treatment for asthma.
The clinic at Solotvyno salt mine is unique because its tunnels, which are 300 metres below ground level and remain at a steady 22°C (72°F) all year round, are the deepest in the world to be used for such purposes. Around three to five thousand people are treated here every year and there is often a waiting list – in fact, at any one time up to 200 people, a third of whom are usually children, can be receiving therapy. Patients spend an average of 24 days at the facility, using a lift to travel underground for afternoon or overnight sessions. During this time they talk, read or sleep on beds, grouped together in alcoves which are carved out of the rock and lit by fluorescent tubes. (via Kirill Kuletski © 2009)

This underground facility is situated within the Solotvyno salt mine near a small Ukrainian village of the same name, close to the Romanian border. It was opened during Soviet times in the 1970s, and operates alongside the Ukrainian State Allergy Hospital which is also located nearby.

The therapy which takes place at Solotvyno is based on a method known as Speleo-therapy, an alternative therapy for asthma and other respiratory diseases. This therapy was discovered in Poland in the 1950s when it was noticed that salt mine workers rarely suffered from tuberculosis. Scientists found that the salt-permeated air of the working salt mine helped to dissolve phlegm in the bronchial tubes and also killed the micro-organisms which caused infections – and that this greatly helped patients who were undertaking treatment for asthma.

The clinic at Solotvyno salt mine is unique because its tunnels, which are 300 metres below ground level and remain at a steady 22°C (72°F) all year round, are the deepest in the world to be used for such purposes. Around three to five thousand people are treated here every year and there is often a waiting list – in fact, at any one time up to 200 people, a third of whom are usually children, can be receiving therapy. Patients spend an average of 24 days at the facility, using a lift to travel underground for afternoon or overnight sessions. During this time they talk, read or sleep on beds, grouped together in alcoves which are carved out of the rock and lit by fluorescent tubes. (via Kirill Kuletski © 2009)

2 years ago
Did natural selection help African-Americans adapt to the harsh conditions of their new lives as slaves in the Americas? A team of researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai report in the journal Genome Research that “certain disease-causing variant genes became more common in African-Americans after their ancestors reached American shores — perhaps because they conferred greater, offsetting benefits.” Read more at the NY Times.

Did natural selection help African-Americans adapt to the harsh conditions of their new lives as slaves in the Americas? A team of researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai report in the journal Genome Research that “certain disease-causing variant genes became more common in African-Americans after their ancestors reached American shores — perhaps because they conferred greater, offsetting benefits.” Read more at the NY Times.

2 years ago
2 years ago
Urban legends, rural legends, folk medicines, you’ve probably heard about tons of such things over the years. True or, more likely, untrue events and cures which may, but probably don’t, have legitimate and verifiable scientific bases for capturing the imagination and curing medical symptoms. No, this isn’t a rant about people’s odd beliefs or half the shows on the Syfy Channel. It’s merely an introduction to the latest dubious medical craze in Indonesia. It seems folks in that country are intentionally trying to electrocute themselves on railroad tracks in the belief that it will cure various diseases, both mental and physical. It is a new trend which Indonesian government officials are trying desperately to stop before it causes a wave of accidental deaths. This railroad shock therapy started, as such things always do, with a rumor that a man who actually tried using train rails to commit suicide ended up having his paralysis and chronic depression shocked away by the electric current in the tracks. Although this miraculous tale cannot be verified, it has spread all over Indonesia and given people the courage to try electrocution by rail in order to cure everything from sleeping disorders to diabetes. In our book, this is just crazy stuff, and a greater risk to human life than the legendary poodle in the microwave. (Wall Street Journal Asia – Indonesian Rail Shock Treatment)

Urban legends, rural legends, folk medicines, you’ve probably heard about tons of such things over the years. True or, more likely, untrue events and cures which may, but probably don’t, have legitimate and verifiable scientific bases for capturing the imagination and curing medical symptoms. No, this isn’t a rant about people’s odd beliefs or half the shows on the Syfy Channel. It’s merely an introduction to the latest dubious medical craze in Indonesia. It seems folks in that country are intentionally trying to electrocute themselves on railroad tracks in the belief that it will cure various diseases, both mental and physical. It is a new trend which Indonesian government officials are trying desperately to stop before it causes a wave of accidental deaths. This railroad shock therapy started, as such things always do, with a rumor that a man who actually tried using train rails to commit suicide ended up having his paralysis and chronic depression shocked away by the electric current in the tracks. Although this miraculous tale cannot be verified, it has spread all over Indonesia and given people the courage to try electrocution by rail in order to cure everything from sleeping disorders to diabetes. In our book, this is just crazy stuff, and a greater risk to human life than the legendary poodle in the microwave. (Wall Street Journal Asia – Indonesian Rail Shock Treatment)

2 years ago 2 years ago