1 month ago

homelesssigns:

April 2013, Harvard Square, Cambridge, MA

Name: Mike a.k.a. “The Pope of Harvard Square”

Where are you originally from?
I was born and raised in Boston, MA. 

How old are you?
  57 years old.

What was it like growing up?

I’m adopted Ok. I was adopted through the Catholic Charities at 4 months old to the best family in the world. My father owned funeral homes and construction sites. My mother was a stay-at-home wife. I also had a sister who was adopted. My family are all dead now.

How long have you been homeless?

Since 2009.

How did you become homeless?

I always did relatively well in life. I was a construction work supervisor. In 2008 I had a mild stroke, and months later was laid off during the economic crash. I have a lot of medical bills, and because I haven’t fully recovered from my stroke, I can’t go back into the construction business again. My health is about 65% back to where it was, and I’m grateful for that. But my poor health hinders me from going back into my trade.

How do you get through the cold winters?

It is very tough. Very tough. The problem is when you wake up with 6 inches of snow on you. There is never enough space in the shelters, and you don’t know where your next meal is going to come from. Fortunately, some businesses in Cambridge allow you to sleep in the door ways of some of the stores for shelter.

What is your biggest struggle being homeless?

Maintaining interpersonal relationships. Everybody in the streets are always coming and going. You have friends that are here today but are gone tomorrow. 

I want to thank you guys for your donation of twenty dollars. It will really help me get through this week.

- C Hope

2 months ago
“The shuttle takes me to downtown Phoenix and every bar I go into there are guys with stitches around the rim of an eye socket where a good slam packed their face meat against its sharp edge. There are guys with sideways noses, and these guys at the bar see me with the puckered hole in my cheek and we’re an instant family.”
‘FIGHT CLUB’ RE-COVERED BOOKS CONTEST WINNER: JARED FANNING
(Editor’s note: The Re-Covered Books Contest is so brilliant. Kindle or iBooks should let you change covers.)

“The shuttle takes me to downtown Phoenix and every bar I go into there are guys with stitches around the rim of an eye socket where a good slam packed their face meat against its sharp edge. There are guys with sideways noses, and these guys at the bar see me with the puckered hole in my cheek and we’re an instant family.”

‘FIGHT CLUB’ RE-COVERED BOOKS CONTEST WINNER: JARED FANNING

(Editor’s note: The Re-Covered Books Contest is so brilliant. Kindle or iBooks should let you change covers.)

3 months ago
Moon Phase Calendar by Annie Axtell

Moon Phase Calendar by Annie Axtell

4 months ago
Olly Moss
9 months ago

Gifpop is a tool to make custom cards from animated gifs, using the magic of lenticular printing. Gifs rule. Sha and Rachel rule.

Back it on Kickstarter!

9 months ago
Inoue Tsuguya: Graphic Works 1981-2007
"I wanted to produce a book that was pregnant with primitive power, a book through which the hot winds of summer blew, but what emerged was much simpler, it had the feel of a summer picture diary from my past: "I got up, ate water melon and went to bed." I am interested in letters and photographs and have attempted, through my work, to be faithful to the appetites of my eyes. But, like a brilliant chimera, I am disheartened to discover that I’ve been looking at a mirage. I feel something akin to what "bipedal hominids" must have felt having finally evolved far enough from the apes to be able to stand erect (thus gaining a modicum of freedom as they began walking towards the future). I am eternally grateful to Mr. Kaho Son of Little More Co., Ltd. for creating this auspicious and upbeat book that carries something of the memories of those early hominids."
(Editor’s note: One of the best books on my shelf. Very rare.)

Inoue Tsuguya: Graphic Works 1981-2007

"I wanted to produce a book that was pregnant with primitive power, a book through which the hot winds of summer blew, but what emerged was much simpler, it had the feel of a summer picture diary from my past: "I got up, ate water melon and went to bed." I am interested in letters and photographs and have attempted, through my work, to be faithful to the appetites of my eyes. But, like a brilliant chimera, I am disheartened to discover that I’ve been looking at a mirage. I feel something akin to what "bipedal hominids" must have felt having finally evolved far enough from the apes to be able to stand erect (thus gaining a modicum of freedom as they began walking towards the future). I am eternally grateful to Mr. Kaho Son of Little More Co., Ltd. for creating this auspicious and upbeat book that carries something of the memories of those early hominids."

(Editor’s note: One of the best books on my shelf. Very rare.)

10 months ago
"The 4 Layers of Design", part of a broader discussion of "The Dribbblisation of Design" written by Paul Adams
Design is a multi layered process. In my experience, there is an optimal order to how you move through the layers. The simplest version of this is to think about four layers.
I see designer after designer focus on the fourth layer without really considering the others. Working from the bottom up rather than the top down. The grid, font, colour, and aesthetic style are irrelevant if the other three layers haven’t been resolved first. Many designers say they do this, but don’t walk the walk, because sometimes it’s just more fun to draw nice pictures and bury oneself in pixels than deal with complicated business decisions and people with different opinions. That’s fine, stay in the fourth layer, but that’s art not design. You’re a digital artist, not a designer.

"The 4 Layers of Design", part of a broader discussion of "The Dribbblisation of Design" written by Paul Adams

Design is a multi layered process. In my experience, there is an optimal order to how you move through the layers. The simplest version of this is to think about four layers.

I see designer after designer focus on the fourth layer without really considering the others. Working from the bottom up rather than the top down. The grid, font, colour, and aesthetic style are irrelevant if the other three layers haven’t been resolved first. Many designers say they do this, but don’t walk the walk, because sometimes it’s just more fun to draw nice pictures and bury oneself in pixels than deal with complicated business decisions and people with different opinions. That’s fine, stay in the fourth layer, but that’s art not design. You’re a digital artist, not a designer.

10 months ago

For Punch-Drunk Love, Toho-Towa,the Japanese distributor, produced a series of nine designs based on the lush colorfield “motion paintings” by Jeremy Blake that punctuate the film and add to its hallucinatory quality (seehere). Blake was a rising star in the Los Angeles art world and a pioneer in digital painting when Paul Thomas Anderson commissioned the work (the same year that Blake also created the four covers for Beck’s Sea Change album). But, as reported a couple of years ago in New York Magazine and Vanity Fair, a series of personal set-backs, culminating in the 2007 suicide of his partner and fellow artist Theresa Duncan, led to the 35-year-old Blake taking his own life by walking into the sea at Rockaway Beach.

It was rumored that Bret Easton Ellis was writing a script about the tragic couple’s life, with Gus Van Sant attached in some capacity, but that remains to be seen. Van Sant’s upcoming film Restless, a film reported to be about “two lovers with a preoccupation with mortality” but based on a play by Jason Lew, is probably coincidental. (via MUBI)

11 months ago
itwonlast:
Yvon Chouinard: You remember the trips that lasted for a long time. The way people do trips now, they take, a week, they go to Europe—you don’t remember those trips very much. Or you go surfing in Indo for a week. But if you had to go over land or take a boat, it’s really different. That trip to Mount Fitz Roy lasted six months and in that time there were a lot of adventures on the way. Like sleeping on the ground in Guatemala and waking up to a gun to our heads—there was so much going on. It became a really important trip in my life. At the time I was thinking about starting this clothing company, and I wanted to make clothes for the conditions we found down there, which are like hurricane force winds and the evening with its orange look and its lenticular clouds. I thought, ‘This, this is what I want to make clothes for, I want to make clothes for Cape Horn and Patagonia.’ I came up with the idea for the logo (the skyline of Mt.Fitzroy looking west) . At the time, Patagonia was like Timbuktu, which is this mystical place. Everybody kind of knew where it was, but didn’t really.

itwonlast:

Yvon Chouinard: You remember the trips that lasted for a long time. The way people do trips now, they take, a week, they go to Europe—you don’t remember those trips very much. Or you go surfing in Indo for a week. But if you had to go over land or take a boat, it’s really different. That trip to Mount Fitz Roy lasted six months and in that time there were a lot of adventures on the way. Like sleeping on the ground in Guatemala and waking up to a gun to our heads—there was so much going on. It became a really important trip in my life. At the time I was thinking about starting this clothing company, and I wanted to make clothes for the conditions we found down there, which are like hurricane force winds and the evening with its orange look and its lenticular clouds. I thought, ‘This, this is what I want to make clothes for, I want to make clothes for Cape Horn and Patagonia.’ I came up with the idea for the logo (the skyline of Mt.Fitzroy looking west) . At the time, Patagonia was like Timbuktu, which is this mystical place. Everybody kind of knew where it was, but didn’t really.

12 months ago

Until the End of the Road, book design by Wang Zhi Hong