2 months ago
“The shuttle takes me to downtown Phoenix and every bar I go into there are guys with stitches around the rim of an eye socket where a good slam packed their face meat against its sharp edge. There are guys with sideways noses, and these guys at the bar see me with the puckered hole in my cheek and we’re an instant family.”
‘FIGHT CLUB’ RE-COVERED BOOKS CONTEST WINNER: JARED FANNING
(Editor’s note: The Re-Covered Books Contest is so brilliant. Kindle or iBooks should let you change covers.)

“The shuttle takes me to downtown Phoenix and every bar I go into there are guys with stitches around the rim of an eye socket where a good slam packed their face meat against its sharp edge. There are guys with sideways noses, and these guys at the bar see me with the puckered hole in my cheek and we’re an instant family.”

‘FIGHT CLUB’ RE-COVERED BOOKS CONTEST WINNER: JARED FANNING

(Editor’s note: The Re-Covered Books Contest is so brilliant. Kindle or iBooks should let you change covers.)

2 months ago 3 months ago
'Never Built Los Angeles' explores the ‘what if’ Los Angeles, investigating the values and untapped potential of a city still in search of itself. A treasure trove of buildings, master plans, parks, follies and mass-transit proposals that only saw the drawing board, the book asks: why is Los Angeles a mecca for great architects, yet so lacking in urban innovation? Featured are more than 100 visionary works that could have transformed both the physical reality and the collective perception of the metropolis, from Olmsted Brothers and Bartholomew’s groundbreaking 1930 Plan for the Los Angeles Region, which would have increased the amount of green space in the notoriously park-poor city fivefold; to John Lautner’s Alto Capistrano, a series of spaceship-like apartments hovering above a mixed-use development; to Jean Nouvel’s 2008 Green Blade, a condominium tower clad entirely in cascading plants. Through text and more than 400 color and black-and-white illustrations drawn from archives around the U.S., authors Sam Lubell and Greg Goldin explore the visceral (and sometimes misleading) power of architectural ideas conveyed through sketches, renderings, blueprints, models and the now waning art of hand drawing. Many of these schemes—promoting a denser, more vibrant city—are still relevant today and could inspire future designs. ‘Never Built Los Angeles’ will set the stage for a renewed interest in visionary projects in this, one of the world’s great cities.

'Never Built Los Angeles' explores the ‘what if’ Los Angeles, investigating the values and untapped potential of a city still in search of itself. A treasure trove of buildings, master plans, parks, follies and mass-transit proposals that only saw the drawing board, the book asks: why is Los Angeles a mecca for great architects, yet so lacking in urban innovation? Featured are more than 100 visionary works that could have transformed both the physical reality and the collective perception of the metropolis, from Olmsted Brothers and Bartholomew’s groundbreaking 1930 Plan for the Los Angeles Region, which would have increased the amount of green space in the notoriously park-poor city fivefold; to John Lautner’s Alto Capistrano, a series of spaceship-like apartments hovering above a mixed-use development; to Jean Nouvel’s 2008 Green Blade, a condominium tower clad entirely in cascading plants. Through text and more than 400 color and black-and-white illustrations drawn from archives around the U.S., authors Sam Lubell and Greg Goldin explore the visceral (and sometimes misleading) power of architectural ideas conveyed through sketches, renderings, blueprints, models and the now waning art of hand drawing. Many of these schemes—promoting a denser, more vibrant city—are still relevant today and could inspire future designs. ‘Never Built Los Angeles’ will set the stage for a renewed interest in visionary projects in this, one of the world’s great cities.

3 months ago
5 months ago

Taking as its starting point the extensive ethnographic collections of the Weltkulturen Museum, Trading Style constitutes an unprecedented dialogue between the past and future worlds of fashion. It juxtaposes archive photos, historic artifacts and objects with prototypes for new collections from A Kind of Guise, Buki Akib, Cassette Playa and P.A.M.

Trading Style

5 months ago
P.T. Anderson signing on to direct Thomas Pynchon’s “Inherent Vice” might be the most concrete evidence to date that there is a god.

P.T. Anderson signing on to direct Thomas Pynchon’s “Inherent Vice” might be the most concrete evidence to date that there is a god.

7 months ago
Reading "In The Miso Soup" is like going to McDonald, buying a Big Mac and finding a severed eyeball under the bun….Then putting the bun back on and eating it, eyeball and all. What starts out as a sleazy, guilty pleasure of a pulp novel about an American tourist and his guide visiting the Tokyo pleasure palaces turns into a soup broth of over-the-top violence and nutty serial killer philosophy that makes Jeffrey Dahmer seem like the boy next door. Yet In The Miso Soup remains riveting throughout its strange tale. Aside from the gruesome story, there is a American Psycho styled look at the edge of society that Murakami is focusing on. He questions the way our society chases sex and pleasure and wonders about the harm that it does to the human psyche. There is also much about the differences and conflicts between Eastern and Western culture. Some of the passages are immensely disturbing in its casualness, such as this remark by a boy who likes to work in Tokyo’s sex district.
Hey, I wouldn’t say I love Kabuchi-ko - I mean I doubt if anyone loves it - but it’s an amazingly easy place to be, and who’s going to think about sticking needles into little girls eyes when they’re working in a town they like and have a chance to go to the university of their choice.”
and it gets scarier.So obviously this is not for everyone. But I have an uncomfortable admiration for the way the author tells a unrelenting suspenseful story and the way he makes you think about the psychological questions of good and evil nagging throughout the book. Recommended for those with strong stomachs. (via)

Reading "In The Miso Soup" is like going to McDonald, buying a Big Mac and finding a severed eyeball under the bun….Then putting the bun back on and eating it, eyeball and all. What starts out as a sleazy, guilty pleasure of a pulp novel about an American tourist and his guide visiting the Tokyo pleasure palaces turns into a soup broth of over-the-top violence and nutty serial killer philosophy that makes Jeffrey Dahmer seem like the boy next door. Yet In The Miso Soup remains riveting throughout its strange tale. Aside from the gruesome story, there is a American Psycho styled look at the edge of society that Murakami is focusing on. He questions the way our society chases sex and pleasure and wonders about the harm that it does to the human psyche. There is also much about the differences and conflicts between Eastern and Western culture. Some of the passages are immensely disturbing in its casualness, such as this remark by a boy who likes to work in Tokyo’s sex district.

Hey, I wouldn’t say I love Kabuchi-ko - I mean I doubt if anyone loves it - but it’s an amazingly easy place to be, and who’s going to think about sticking needles into little girls eyes when they’re working in a town they like and have a chance to go to the university of their choice.”


and it gets scarier.

So obviously this is not for everyone. But I have an uncomfortable admiration for the way the author tells a unrelenting suspenseful story and the way he makes you think about the psychological questions of good and evil nagging throughout the book. Recommended for those with strong stomachs. (via)

7 months ago
The Book of Goodbyes by Jillian Weise
"In a world where subway cars are filled with passengers staring at tiny screens, where to like something you click something, we are lucky to have Jillian Weise’s new book of poems to take to bed, to take on the bus, to sneak into our pacified English Lit curriculum. The Book of Goodbyes is a narrative, lyric, modern, mash-up of our experience on earth."—Matthew Dickman
"The Book of Goodbyes is in effect a Book of Eternal Returns. The poems lead us through our minute daily-life distractions with a matter-of-fact candor that expands the dimensions of intimacy available to us. Ultimately, the Goodbye itself is the muse here – to leave a thing, an idea, a person, a way of life that limits your own being – and to sing for the process of leaving. Weise helps us understand that when we say goodbye, we leave something in the past as much as in the future—this book is a beautiful lesson in how to do exactly that, and in how the humbleness of doing so is in fact heroic."—Harmony Holiday

The Book of Goodbyes by Jillian Weise

"In a world where subway cars are filled with passengers staring at tiny screens, where to like something you click something, we are lucky to have Jillian Weise’s new book of poems to take to bed, to take on the bus, to sneak into our pacified English Lit curriculum. The Book of Goodbyes is a narrative, lyric, modern, mash-up of our experience on earth."
—Matthew Dickman

"The Book of Goodbyes is in effect a Book of Eternal Returns. The poems lead us through our minute daily-life distractions with a matter-of-fact candor that expands the dimensions of intimacy available to us. Ultimately, the Goodbye itself is the muse here – to leave a thing, an idea, a person, a way of life that limits your own being – and to sing for the process of leaving. Weise helps us understand that when we say goodbye, we leave something in the past as much as in the future—this book is a beautiful lesson in how to do exactly that, and in how the humbleness of doing so is in fact heroic."
—Harmony Holiday

8 months ago
What is Creativity?
René belongs to a very small group of unique creators. People who have turned their partiular niches completely upside-down. Reinvented and redefined them. The Unafraid. Whether it be Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Charlie Parker, Beethoven, the Beatles, Cecil B. DeMille, Francis Ford Coppola, Quentin Tarantino, Jack Kerouac, James Joyce, Hunter S. Thompson, Steve Jobs, Stephen Hawking, Marlon Brando, the list goes on depending who’s composing it…but no matter who’s on that list, or how long it is, René Redzepi BELONGS on that list.
René Redzepi: A Work in Progress. A deeply honest journal from the Michelin three star chef that became a book. Monocle has a great radio interview with him here about the highs and lows of being the best.

What is Creativity?

René belongs to a very small group of unique creators. People who have turned their partiular niches completely upside-down. Reinvented and redefined them. The Unafraid. Whether it be Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Charlie Parker, Beethoven, the Beatles, Cecil B. DeMille, Francis Ford Coppola, Quentin Tarantino, Jack Kerouac, James Joyce, Hunter S. Thompson, Steve Jobs, Stephen Hawking, Marlon Brando, the list goes on depending who’s composing it…but no matter who’s on that list, or how long it is, René Redzepi BELONGS on that list.

René Redzepi: A Work in Progress. A deeply honest journal from the Michelin three star chef that became a book. Monocle has a great radio interview with him here about the highs and lows of being the best.

8 months ago