8 months ago
Joan Jett playing softball in Sherman Oaks, 1977. Photo by Brad Elterman. Get his book "Dog Dance" out now!

Joan Jett playing softball in Sherman Oaks, 1977. Photo by Brad Elterman. Get his book "Dog Dance" out now!

9 months ago 11 months ago
Charles “Boss” Schmidt (September 12, 1880 – November 14, 1932) was an American catcher in Major League Baseball who played six seasons with the Detroit Tigers (1906–1911).
Schmidt was born in Coal Hill, Arkansas and began his professional playing career in the Missouri Valley League in 1902. Joining the Tigers in 1906, Schmidt shared playing time with two other catchers on the team’s roster, John Warner and Fred Payne. The following season, he became the team’s starting catcher as the Tigers won three consecutive American League pennants from 1907 to 1909.
Schmidt had 6 hits and 5 RBIs in three World Series from 1907 to 1909. He also holds the dubious distinction of having committed five errors and allowed 16 stolen bases during the 1908 World Series—both records which still stand today. Schmidt also made the last out in consecutive World Series in 1907-08, the only player ever to do so. Schmidt also let the 3rd strike with 2 outs in the bottom of the ninth of Game 1 of the 1907 Series get away, allowing a run to score, which tied the game. After 12 innings the game was called on account of darkness and the game was ruled a tie. Also, in the 1907 World Series, Schmidt gave up a record 7 stolen bases in Game 3, the most against one catcher in one Series game.
Schmidt’s best season was 1908, in which he had career highs in hits (111), runs batted in (38), walks (16), and batting average (.265). In 477 career games, Schmidt batted .243 with 360 hits and 3 home runs. He also served as a base umpire in three games in 1906-07, as active players were often used as substitute umpires.
As a young man, Schmidt worked in the coal mines and developed a muscular and powerful physique. According to the Detroit Tigers information office, Schmidt beat Cobb in several fights.[1] In the second fight, Schmidt knocked Cobb unconscious but admired Cobb’s resiliency while fighting and stayed to revive Cobb as he lay motionless on the Tiger dressing room floor. Despite their clashes, Schmidt and Cobb (both tough as nails) became close friends until Schmidt’s death in 1932.
Schmidt also played a role in Cobb’s March 1907 fist fight with an African American groundskeeper. When the groundskeeper tried to shake Cobb’s hand, Cobb slapped him and chased him to the clubhouse. The groundskeeper’s wife yelled at Cobb, and Cobb began to choke her. Schmidt intervened and stopped Cobb from hurting her further. Cobb and Schmidt then got into a fight and had to be separated by their teammates.
Schmidt was a skilled brawler who reportedly even fought an exhibition match with the heavyweight champion, Jack Johnson. He felt that he was the best fighting baseball player in the league and challenged all baseball players to a match.
Aside from his prowess as a fighter, Schmidt was also known for other displays of his physical toughness. As a catcher, Schmidt never wore shinguards. He could force nails into the floor with his bare fists. He once visited a local carnival with some of his teammates and wrestled and pinned a live bear. Schmidt’s career was shortened due to numerous fractures sustained over the years of his thumb and fingers.

Charles “Boss” Schmidt (September 12, 1880 – November 14, 1932) was an American catcher in Major League Baseball who played six seasons with the Detroit Tigers (1906–1911).

Schmidt was born in Coal Hill, Arkansas and began his professional playing career in the Missouri Valley League in 1902. Joining the Tigers in 1906, Schmidt shared playing time with two other catchers on the team’s roster, John Warner and Fred Payne. The following season, he became the team’s starting catcher as the Tigers won three consecutive American League pennants from 1907 to 1909.

Schmidt had 6 hits and 5 RBIs in three World Series from 1907 to 1909. He also holds the dubious distinction of having committed five errors and allowed 16 stolen bases during the 1908 World Series—both records which still stand today. Schmidt also made the last out in consecutive World Series in 1907-08, the only player ever to do so. Schmidt also let the 3rd strike with 2 outs in the bottom of the ninth of Game 1 of the 1907 Series get away, allowing a run to score, which tied the game. After 12 innings the game was called on account of darkness and the game was ruled a tie. Also, in the 1907 World Series, Schmidt gave up a record 7 stolen bases in Game 3, the most against one catcher in one Series game.

Schmidt’s best season was 1908, in which he had career highs in hits (111), runs batted in (38), walks (16), and batting average (.265). In 477 career games, Schmidt batted .243 with 360 hits and 3 home runs. He also served as a base umpire in three games in 1906-07, as active players were often used as substitute umpires.

As a young man, Schmidt worked in the coal mines and developed a muscular and powerful physique. According to the Detroit Tigers information office, Schmidt beat Cobb in several fights.[1] In the second fight, Schmidt knocked Cobb unconscious but admired Cobb’s resiliency while fighting and stayed to revive Cobb as he lay motionless on the Tiger dressing room floor. Despite their clashes, Schmidt and Cobb (both tough as nails) became close friends until Schmidt’s death in 1932.

Schmidt also played a role in Cobb’s March 1907 fist fight with an African American groundskeeper. When the groundskeeper tried to shake Cobb’s hand, Cobb slapped him and chased him to the clubhouse. The groundskeeper’s wife yelled at Cobb, and Cobb began to choke her. Schmidt intervened and stopped Cobb from hurting her further. Cobb and Schmidt then got into a fight and had to be separated by their teammates.

Schmidt was a skilled brawler who reportedly even fought an exhibition match with the heavyweight champion, Jack Johnson. He felt that he was the best fighting baseball player in the league and challenged all baseball players to a match.

Aside from his prowess as a fighter, Schmidt was also known for other displays of his physical toughness. As a catcher, Schmidt never wore shinguards. He could force nails into the floor with his bare fists. He once visited a local carnival with some of his teammates and wrestled and pinned a live bear. Schmidt’s career was shortened due to numerous fractures sustained over the years of his thumb and fingers.

1 year ago
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(via ak47)

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You watch enough baseball, you get that feeling. There was certainly a buzz in the ballpark. Giants fans were standing up on two-strike counts from the moment I tuned in. They seemed to know. My 14-year-old nephew is up visiting from Florida. He has been here two weeks and we already watched the end of the Johan Santana no-hitter. My wife and T.J.’s dad are Mets fans, so he called his dad on the phone, giving him the play-by-play as Santana pitched through the ninth. The three of us jumped and hugged and celebrated together as Santana completed the no-no. 

On this night, T.J and I sat on the couch. I told him I think he can do it, Cain’s stuff looks unhittable. The changeup and two-seamer have great movement. Then came the catch. 

The greatest I’ve ever seen. Gregor Blanco did not catch that ball. Impossible. Not where Jordan Schafer hit it, leading off the seventh inning. We yelled and cheered as Blanco ran forever, hauling in the uncatchable with a miraculous diving grab snared in the fingertips of his glove. My wife came downstairs, wondered what happened. We showed her the replay and counted Blanco’s strides: 15? 18? No, maybe 20. What is that, 60 feet, 70 feet? 

Willie Mays, you have company. 

This is what baseball can do. Gregor Blanco, a small speck in the dust of baseball history, will now be remembered. 

As the ninth inning began, I reminded T.J. that his other uncle and cousin had once been at a game at Fenway Park when Mike Mussina lost a perfect game with two outs in the ninth. Many perfect games and no-hitters have been lost with three outs or fewer to go. 

But not on this night. Two easy fly balls to left field. And then Jason Castro, left-handed batter, squibbed a 1-2 grounder to third baseman Joaquin Arias, who stumbled back a step as he fielded the ball, recovered and threw a laser to first base. Good thing the Giants didn’t have of these new-fangled shifts going on. A perfect game. “He did it!” we shouted in our living room in Connecticut, two baseball fans enjoying the moment. (via ESPN)

2 years ago