3 months ago

bobaguysBoba Guys Black Card. We made it for Jack Dorsey but you can get one for yourself by backing our Kickstarter!

1 year ago
"Actual Wealth vs Alleged Wealth of Rappers" Chart
1 year ago

“The year I turned 26, I made $49 million, which really pissed me off because it was three shy of $1 million a week.” —The Wolf of Wall Street, based on Jordan Belfort’s memoir and directed by Martin Scorsese.

1 year ago
peternyc:
This post was meant to be an excuse to use the VSCO app on my iphone, but apparently there’s a glitch that causes images to save faded. So I decided to do post-process on my computer and post this anyway.
I found this $2 bill a while ago on the street. It’s my lucky $2 bill. Did you know that in American culture the $2 bill is considered unlucky? I didn’t realize this until I tried to look up why it’s considered lucky in Asian cultures. Pay attention next time you’re in a Vietnamese restaurant. You’ll most likely see $2 bills taped behind the counter.
According to Snopes, Americans avoid the $2 bill for a few reasons.
1. At the time it was created, prostitutes used to cost $2. Thus, if you had a $2 bill it was thought that it was passed around a whorehouse at some point. 
2. People who sold their votes were paid $2. So if you walked around with a $2 bill it meant you were a dishonest vote seller. 
3. The standard horse bet was $2, so if you had a $2 on you it made it seem like you were a degenerate gambler. 
4. Deuce is a slang term for the devil, “The deuce you say!”. Thus, it is the bill of the devil. 
Of course, asians see it differently. The bills are rare, so they’re popular during Tet (Lunar New Year), where money is given as gifts in red envelopes for luck.
I learned they’re so popular that there is an actual resale market for them. Bills printed in 2003 (like mine above, though it’s not in the best condition) are worth $2.50-$3. You can get $7.50-$8 for a bill printed in 1976. But the holy grail bills, ones with serial numbers ending in the four of the same numbers (like 4444) can fetch up to $125, and often require you to pay a small fee for a chance to bid on them.

peternyc:

This post was meant to be an excuse to use the VSCO app on my iphone, but apparently there’s a glitch that causes images to save faded. So I decided to do post-process on my computer and post this anyway.

I found this $2 bill a while ago on the street. It’s my lucky $2 bill. Did you know that in American culture the $2 bill is considered unlucky? I didn’t realize this until I tried to look up why it’s considered lucky in Asian cultures. Pay attention next time you’re in a Vietnamese restaurant. You’ll most likely see $2 bills taped behind the counter.

According to Snopes, Americans avoid the $2 bill for a few reasons.

1. At the time it was created, prostitutes used to cost $2. Thus, if you had a $2 bill it was thought that it was passed around a whorehouse at some point. 

2. People who sold their votes were paid $2. So if you walked around with a $2 bill it meant you were a dishonest vote seller. 

3. The standard horse bet was $2, so if you had a $2 on you it made it seem like you were a degenerate gambler. 

4. Deuce is a slang term for the devil, “The deuce you say!”. Thus, it is the bill of the devil. 

Of course, asians see it differently. The bills are rare, so they’re popular during Tet (Lunar New Year), where money is given as gifts in red envelopes for luck.

I learned they’re so popular that there is an actual resale market for them. Bills printed in 2003 (like mine above, though it’s not in the best condition) are worth $2.50-$3. You can get $7.50-$8 for a bill printed in 1976. But the holy grail bills, ones with serial numbers ending in the four of the same numbers (like 4444) can fetch up to $125, and often require you to pay a small fee for a chance to bid on them.

(Source: peternyc)

1 year ago 1 year ago
I was hanging out all comfy, at my crib in bed. Now I have endless meetings with…the Fed…Later it Karaoke, drinkin’ soju till I’m smoked…Crusin’ to Tokyo, Hong Kong. It’s a blast…Check out my threads, dawg, I’m Gucci, my junk real good. Check out my bling-bling, so iced out, so Hollywood. Cite Arrow From a rap penned by a top AIG executive about the $182 billion bailout.  (via motherjones)
1 year ago
2 years ago

Two houses down from my house is this house. I am mustering up the courage to invite myself over with some brownies.

Completed in 2002, this new home in San Francisco is conceived as a series of interlocking forms, stepping up the hill and out of the earth to become a transparent glass form bound by the planar structure. This linear language informs the details throughout, appearing in the plan, elevations and custom furniture design.  The street level entry opens to a sculpture court where an open, steel and concrete stairway leads to a terrace and the formal front door.  All three living levels enjoy panoramic views of the city from the front and the serenity of a Japanese inspired garden to the rear. (via)

2 years ago
Prospecting & Gold in the Hills
2 years ago