1 year ago
Nothing about the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Blimp makes sense. An enormous, slow-moving, easily attackable vehicle would seem idiotic even if the Turtles weren’t carrying tons of sharp edged objects that could easily puncture the hull. Then there’s the issue of storage. How do you get a gigantic blimp down into the sewers?

Nothing about the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Blimp makes sense. An enormous, slow-moving, easily attackable vehicle would seem idiotic even if the Turtles weren’t carrying tons of sharp edged objects that could easily puncture the hull. Then there’s the issue of storage. How do you get a gigantic blimp down into the sewers?

2 years ago
2 years ago

(via techspec)

2 years ago
Jeff Staple x Benny Gold
2 years ago

Silk kites have existed for nearly 3000 years, and it’s known that paper kites existed as early as 589 AD. Recently found in a basement in Saint Louis, Missouri, these beautifully hand-crafted, hand screened paper kites are truly the last of their kind.
The Crunden-Martin Manufacturing Company in Saint Louis, Missouri was one of several kite manufacturers in the Midwest of the United States in the mid-20th Century. Unable to keep up with the video game culture of the 1980s, the company filed for bankruptcy in 1990 and was never to be heard from again. That is, until now.

Silk kites have existed for nearly 3000 years, and it’s known that paper kites existed as early as 589 AD. Recently found in a basement in Saint Louis, Missouri, these beautifully hand-crafted, hand screened paper kites are truly the last of their kind.

The Crunden-Martin Manufacturing Company in Saint Louis, Missouri was one of several kite manufacturers in the Midwest of the United States in the mid-20th Century. Unable to keep up with the video game culture of the 1980s, the company filed for bankruptcy in 1990 and was never to be heard from again. That is, until now.

2 years ago
How To Guide: Mile High Club
2 years ago
beef-san: F-16 FIGHTING FALCON

beef-san: F-16 FIGHTING FALCON

2 years ago
Being in flight is one of the most unnatural, extraordinary, ordinary experiences of modern life. When we climb to 30,000 feet, our perspective looking down at the world becomes that of a deity, and the rules of time and space are altered as we rush over the earth. In flight we are able to view the most remote corners of the natural world and the vast spread of the world we have constructed. It gives us the unique perspective to look at the interaction of the natural and constructed in a truly holistic way. In its totality, the unnatural or extraordinary experience produces great fear and excitement. We confront death a little every time the doors close – and this closeness to death intensifies the extraordinary experience of being in flight. On the other hand, our ‘in flight’ experience is filled with the most unremarkable daily activities: reading a comic book, finishing a crossword puzzle, eating, sleeping. The cabin becomes our shared world, temporally removed from the world that we’ve left back on land. What connects the ordinary and the extraordinary is a powerful trust in the human capacity to take us beyond the mundane. The plane becomes a temple of humanism, where we put faith in all that get us and keeps us up in the air – engineers, pilots, researchers, air traffic controllers – a web of people, underwritten by collective knowledge, keeping us alive, together. -Phillip Kalantzis-Cope

Being in flight is one of the most unnatural, extraordinary, ordinary experiences of modern life. When we climb to 30,000 feet, our perspective looking down at the world becomes that of a deity, and the rules of time and space are altered as we rush over the earth. In flight we are able to view the most remote corners of the natural world and the vast spread of the world we have constructed. It gives us the unique perspective to look at the interaction of the natural and constructed in a truly holistic way. In its totality, the unnatural or extraordinary experience produces great fear and excitement. We confront death a little every time the doors close – and this closeness to death intensifies the extraordinary experience of being in flight. On the other hand, our ‘in flight’ experience is filled with the most unremarkable daily activities: reading a comic book, finishing a crossword puzzle, eating, sleeping. The cabin becomes our shared world, temporally removed from the world that we’ve left back on land. What connects the ordinary and the extraordinary is a powerful trust in the human capacity to take us beyond the mundane. The plane becomes a temple of humanism, where we put faith in all that get us and keeps us up in the air – engineers, pilots, researchers, air traffic controllers – a web of people, underwritten by collective knowledge, keeping us alive, together. -Phillip Kalantzis-Cope

2 years ago

(Source: techspec)

2 years ago
On Oct. 14, 1947, the Bell X-1 became the first airplane to fly faster than the speed of sound. Flown by U.S. Air Force Capt. Charles “Chuck” Yeager, the X-1 reached a speed of Mach 1.06 (700 mph) at an altitude of 43,000 feet.

On Oct. 14, 1947, the Bell X-1 became the first airplane to fly faster than the speed of sound. Flown by U.S. Air Force Capt. Charles “Chuck” Yeager, the X-1 reached a speed of Mach 1.06 (700 mph) at an altitude of 43,000 feet.