10 months ago

(Source: deathriders)

1 year ago

Hong Kong (CNN) — The number of Tibetans in China who have set themselves on fire to protest Beijing’s rule has reached 100, according to Tibetan advocacy groups.

Lobsang Namgyal, a 37-year-old former monk, set himself on fire earlier this month in Aba prefecture, known in Tibetan as Ngaba, an ethnically Tibetan area of the Chinese province of Sichuan, according to Free Tibet, a London-based advocacy group.

"This grim milestone should be a source of shame to the Chinese authorities who are responsible and to the world leaders who have yet to show any leadership in response to the ongoing crisis in Tibet," said Stephanie Brigden, the director of Free Tibet.

Self-immolation has become a desperate form of protest in recent years for ethnic Tibetans unhappy with Chinese rule, and it shows no sign of abating.

Of the 100 Tibetans who have now set themselves on fire in China, at least 82 are believed to have died from the act, according to the International Campaign for Tibet.

(Editor’s note: Let’s be real. China is one of the worst countries when it comes to human rights.)

1 year ago
Here he is. Matches in one hand, petrol bottle in the other. He removes the bottle cap, drops it to the ground and douses himself in liquid. He does everything slowly, methodically, as if it were part of a routine he has practiced for years. Then he stops, looks around, and strikes a match.
At this moment nothing in the world can bridge the gap that separates the self-immolator from the others. His total defiance of the survival and self-preservation instincts, his determination to trample on what everybody else finds precious, the ease with which he seems to dispose of his own life, all these place him not only beyond our capacity of understanding, but also outside of human society. He now inhabits a place that most of us find inhabitable. Yet, from there he does not cease to dominate us.

“As he burned he never moved a muscle, never uttered a sound, his outward composure in sharp contrast to the wailing people around him.”

Journalist David Halberstam describes the death of Thích Quàng Đúc, the Vietnamese Buddhist monk who set himself on fire in Saigon in 1963. The quieter the self-immolator the more agitated those around him. The former may slip into nothingness, but his performance changes the latter’s lives forever. They experience repulsion and attraction, terror and boundless reverence, awe and fear, all at once. Over them he now has the uncanniest form of power.
The experience is so powerful because it is so deeply seated in the human psyche. In front of self-immolation, even the most secularized of us have a glimpse into a primordial experience of the sacred. Originally, the sacred is defined as something set apart, cut off from the rest, which remains profane; what we feel towards such a radically different other is precisely a mix of terror and fascination. Self-immolation is a unique event precisely because it awakens deep layers of our ultimate make-up. In a striking, if disguised fashion, self-immolation occasions the experience of the sacred even in a God-forsaken world like ours. (via)

Here he is. Matches in one hand, petrol bottle in the other. He removes the bottle cap, drops it to the ground and douses himself in liquid. He does everything slowly, methodically, as if it were part of a routine he has practiced for years. Then he stops, looks around, and strikes a match.

At this moment nothing in the world can bridge the gap that separates the self-immolator from the others. His total defiance of the survival and self-preservation instincts, his determination to trample on what everybody else finds precious, the ease with which he seems to dispose of his own life, all these place him not only beyond our capacity of understanding, but also outside of human society. He now inhabits a place that most of us find inhabitable. Yet, from there he does not cease to dominate us.

“As he burned he never moved a muscle, never uttered a sound, his outward composure in sharp contrast to the wailing people around him.”

Journalist David Halberstam describes the death of Thích Quàng Đúc, the Vietnamese Buddhist monk who set himself on fire in Saigon in 1963. The quieter the self-immolator the more agitated those around him. The former may slip into nothingness, but his performance changes the latter’s lives forever. They experience repulsion and attraction, terror and boundless reverence, awe and fear, all at once. Over them he now has the uncanniest form of power.

The experience is so powerful because it is so deeply seated in the human psyche. In front of self-immolation, even the most secularized of us have a glimpse into a primordial experience of the sacred. Originally, the sacred is defined as something set apart, cut off from the rest, which remains profane; what we feel towards such a radically different other is precisely a mix of terror and fascination. Self-immolation is a unique event precisely because it awakens deep layers of our ultimate make-up. In a striking, if disguised fashion, self-immolation occasions the experience of the sacred even in a God-forsaken world like ours. (via)

1 year ago
Quartz is emerging in the wake of a financial crisis that exposed a fundamentally changed economic order with new leaders and ways of doing business. In today’s global economy, the most significant developments are found far from the traditional centers of gravity, and traditional ways of understanding the world no longer apply. Aware of this, we intend to do some things differently than you might expect.
Our coverage is rooted in a set of defining obsessions: core topics and knotty questions of seismic importance to business professionals, from the rise of digital payment systems to life in a world of extremely low interest rates to the growth and habits of the consumer class. These are the issues that energize our newsroom, and we invite you to obsess about them along with us.
(Editor’s note: My new favorite site for business news and looks good natively on a phone!)

Quartz is emerging in the wake of a financial crisis that exposed a fundamentally changed economic order with new leaders and ways of doing business. In today’s global economy, the most significant developments are found far from the traditional centers of gravity, and traditional ways of understanding the world no longer apply. Aware of this, we intend to do some things differently than you might expect.

Our coverage is rooted in a set of defining obsessions: core topics and knotty questions of seismic importance to business professionals, from the rise of digital payment systems to life in a world of extremely low interest rates to the growth and habits of the consumer class. These are the issues that energize our newsroom, and we invite you to obsess about them along with us.

(Editor’s note: My new favorite site for business news and looks good natively on a phone!)

1 year ago
Walker
1 year ago
A huge rock, revered by Buddhists and covered in gold leaf, that perches on the edge of a high mountain in Myanmar. Hiroji Kubota shows the sheer magic and power of the rock by cropping off its top. This golden precarious wonder sits dead center against a deep blue sky, its imposing size contrasted with six (small by comparison) crimson-robed priests kneeling to one side of it and the low dark hills below.

A huge rock, revered by Buddhists and covered in gold leaf, that perches on the edge of a high mountain in Myanmar. Hiroji Kubota shows the sheer magic and power of the rock by cropping off its top. This golden precarious wonder sits dead center against a deep blue sky, its imposing size contrasted with six (small by comparison) crimson-robed priests kneeling to one side of it and the low dark hills below.

1 year ago

The temples of Angkor. Cambodia

If, as Goethe said, architecture is frozen music, then Angkor Wat must be a celestial symphony. It was described by the first European to see it as a rival to King Solomon’s temple and that it must have been erected by an ancient Michaelangelo. It is simply the most spectacular ancient temple on earth—it’s mystical splendor a reflection of the genius of ancient builders. Angkor Wat has dominated the Cambodian plain for eight centuries. It has survived the passage of time, the double monsoon of the region, drought, and numerous wars. Facing west, unlike the other temples in Angkor, Angkor Wat is highlighted by its own contrasting shadows as it captures the last rays of the afternoon sun, a crown jewel in an unlikely setting. Its bas reliefs will surely continue to tell their stories for millennia to come. If the Angkor Wat is well-preserved, Ta Prohm has been reclaimed by the jungle. Roots ooze through stones, and trees have attached themselves to the crumbling buildings. Its fate has been literally entwined with the jungle. Somerset Maugham summed up Angkor Wat by saying, “I have not seen anything in the world more beautiful than the temples of Angkor.”

Photographs by Steve McCurry

2 years ago 2 years ago
Quote I found in the momofuku book (Taken with instagram)

Quote I found in the momofuku book (Taken with instagram)

2 years ago