4 years ago
Bobby Fischer’s triumph over Boris Spassky ended the dominance of the seemingly invincible Soviet chess system. From the late 1920s to 1972, Soviets had held the world title for all but two years.
Mr Fischer’s style of play was often hyper-aggressive. Unlike many grandmasters, he always strived to win each game rather than settle for a draw - even when he was playing with the black pieces, which are at a disadvantage as white moves first.
He acquired a reputation for relying on pure mathematical logic, calculating as many positions as humanly possible, rather than on intuition.

Bobby Fischer’s triumph over Boris Spassky ended the dominance of the seemingly invincible Soviet chess system. From the late 1920s to 1972, Soviets had held the world title for all but two years.

Mr Fischer’s style of play was often hyper-aggressive. Unlike many grandmasters, he always strived to win each game rather than settle for a draw - even when he was playing with the black pieces, which are at a disadvantage as white moves first.

He acquired a reputation for relying on pure mathematical logic, calculating as many positions as humanly possible, rather than on intuition.

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