2 years ago
Want a Job? Go to College, and Don’t Major in Architecture
Unemployment for new graduates is around 8.9 percent; the rate for workers with only a high school diploma is nearly three times as high, at 22.9 percent.
That’s according to a new report [PDF] from Georgetown’s Center on Education and the Workforce.
The chart above shows unemployment rates sorted by major, based on 2009-10 census data. You can also see jobless rates for graduates of a given undergraduate major who went on to receive further education (not necessarily related to their college major). In the chart, “recent college graduate” refers to workers who are 22 to 26 years old; “experienced college graduate” covers those 30 to 54; and “graduate degree holder” is limited to workers 30 to 54 years old.
Some majors even produced college graduates who, at mid-career, earned more than workers from other fields who went on to received a tertiary degree. For example, experienced workers whose highest degree was a bachelor’s in health care are more likely to be employed than people with graduate degrees who majored in most other fields.
Those who majored in less technical subjects, like humanities, arts and social science, had higher unemployment rates.
The unemployment rate for recent graduates was highest in architecture, at 13.9 percent, probably at least partly because of the housing market collapse. Even architecture majors who went on to receive graduate degrees, which usually safeguard workers from unemployment, are doing poorly in the job market. With a jobless rate of 7.7 percent, architecture majors who hold graduate degrees are still more likely to be unemployed than newly minted college grads who studied journalism (!).
Those lucky architecture majors with postgraduate degrees who do have jobs are doing O.K., though. Among full-time, full-year workers in this group, median earnings are $71,000:


As you can see in this second chart, many of the majors that produced low unemployment rates also pay pretty well. That makes sense, when you consider that graduates of some fields are in high demand, which forces employers to offer them higher salaries.
That’s not true across the board, however.
People who majored in education, psychology and social work, for example, have low unemployment rates, but don’t make much money. Their earnings also don’t improve a lot when they gain more experience or postgraduate schooling.
“Some majors offer both high security and high earnings, while other majors trade off earnings for job security,” the report says.

Want a Job? Go to College, and Don’t Major in Architecture

Unemployment for new graduates is around 8.9 percent; the rate for workers with only a high school diploma is nearly three times as high, at 22.9 percent.

That’s according to a new report [PDF] from Georgetown’s Center on Education and the Workforce.

The chart above shows unemployment rates sorted by major, based on 2009-10 census data. You can also see jobless rates for graduates of a given undergraduate major who went on to receive further education (not necessarily related to their college major). In the chart, “recent college graduate” refers to workers who are 22 to 26 years old; “experienced college graduate” covers those 30 to 54; and “graduate degree holder” is limited to workers 30 to 54 years old.

Some majors even produced college graduates who, at mid-career, earned more than workers from other fields who went on to received a tertiary degree. For example, experienced workers whose highest degree was a bachelor’s in health care are more likely to be employed than people with graduate degrees who majored in most other fields.

Those who majored in less technical subjects, like humanities, arts and social science, had higher unemployment rates.

The unemployment rate for recent graduates was highest in architecture, at 13.9 percent, probably at least partly because of the housing market collapse. Even architecture majors who went on to receive graduate degrees, which usually safeguard workers from unemployment, are doing poorly in the job market. With a jobless rate of 7.7 percent, architecture majors who hold graduate degrees are still more likely to be unemployed than newly minted college grads who studied journalism (!).

Those lucky architecture majors with postgraduate degrees who do have jobs are doing O.K., though. Among full-time, full-year workers in this group, median earnings are $71,000:

As you can see in this second chart, many of the majors that produced low unemployment rates also pay pretty well. That makes sense, when you consider that graduates of some fields are in high demand, which forces employers to offer them higher salaries.

That’s not true across the board, however.

People who majored in education, psychology and social work, for example, have low unemployment rates, but don’t make much money. Their earnings also don’t improve a lot when they gain more experience or postgraduate schooling.

“Some majors offer both high security and high earnings, while other majors trade off earnings for job security,” the report says.

  1. soitdoesgo reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  2. eternal-tanelorn reblogged this from jms-uk and added:
    Want a Job? Go to College, and Don’t Major in Architecture
  3. art-lolo reblogged this from behinddtheseblueeyes and added:
    Well, guess I’m living with my parents.
  4. sleeptard reblogged this from youmightfindyourself and added:
    man. that really sucks for architecture people.
  5. strikesachord reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  6. klaatu reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  7. luhkar reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  8. shesanightowl reblogged this from youmightfindyourself and added:
    Merrrrrrpppp.
  9. listendamnit reblogged this from cantbuyathrill
  10. jeffreylin reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  11. plainclothesman reblogged this from rgrjnr
  12. jetthekittenstar reblogged this from hello--lamppost
  13. kikuidee reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  14. rgrjnr reblogged this from youmightfindyourself and added:
    AKA the sad truth
  15. cantbuyathrill reblogged this from youmightfindyourself and added:
    what people don’t seem to take into account is that an architect has a skillset that is probably one of the most...
  16. stayingfoolish-toinfinity reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  17. jms-uk reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  18. behinddtheseblueeyes reblogged this from youmightfindyourself and added:
    Well, fuck.
  19. scrapboard said: I assume anyone who likes/reblogs this either is gouging their eyes out or laughing at the people gouging their eyes out
  20. rozellecarlos reblogged this from youmightfindyourself