7 months ago
A Map of the Futuristic Los Angeles Subway From Spike Jonze’s "Her"
Rad subway system designed by Geoff McFetridge. The system ranges from the Angeles National Forest to Malibu over five lines, with stops at some familiar places and some completely invented (I especially love the stations named “Nail Spot” and “Hair Salon”). A new neighborhood, Melrose Center, which I would guess to be around modern-day Koreatown, has become a major hub, bigger than present-day downtown. And for those who bemoan our current transit options at the airport: The train not only goes to LAX now, but it makes THREE stops!
Most notable are the paths of some of the lines. While the gold/teal path almost traces the real-life Gold and Expo Lines (which will bring light rail to Santa Monica in 2015), others seem to mimic current freeway routes. There’s a junction named 101 Freeway Axis, and the orange line running over the Sepulveda Pass looks like it basically traces the 405 Freeway. Who knows? With this system up and running, we might be constructing the light rail lines over abandoned freeways in the future.
McFetridge would especially like to call attention to the fictional transit authority named Los Angeles Metro Light Rail (LAMLR) and the logo he designed for it: “From the Summit to the Sea.”

A Map of the Futuristic Los Angeles Subway From Spike Jonze’s "Her"

Rad subway system designed by Geoff McFetridge. The system ranges from the Angeles National Forest to Malibu over five lines, with stops at some familiar places and some completely invented (I especially love the stations named “Nail Spot” and “Hair Salon”). A new neighborhood, Melrose Center, which I would guess to be around modern-day Koreatown, has become a major hub, bigger than present-day downtown. And for those who bemoan our current transit options at the airport: The train not only goes to LAX now, but it makes THREE stops!

Most notable are the paths of some of the lines. While the gold/teal path almost traces the real-life Gold and Expo Lines (which will bring light rail to Santa Monica in 2015), others seem to mimic current freeway routes. There’s a junction named 101 Freeway Axis, and the orange line running over the Sepulveda Pass looks like it basically traces the 405 Freeway. Who knows? With this system up and running, we might be constructing the light rail lines over abandoned freeways in the future.

McFetridge would especially like to call attention to the fictional transit authority named Los Angeles Metro Light Rail (LAMLR) and the logo he designed for it: “From the Summit to the Sea.”

7 months ago
Xiao Wen Ju
7 months ago
The Lamborghini 350 GT was the first production vehicle produced by Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A. Production started in May 1964, after its well-received debut at the March 1964 Geneva auto show. Its success ensured the company’s survival, establishing it as a viable competitor with sports car maker Ferrari S.p.A. After the testing of his prototype Lamborghini engine in May 1963, Giotto Bizzarrini left the company, and the following month Ferruccio Lamborghini assigned Gian Paolo Dallara — with the assistance of Paolo Stanzani and Bob Wallace — the task of developing a production version of the grand tourer. (via)

The Lamborghini 350 GT was the first production vehicle produced by Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A. Production started in May 1964, after its well-received debut at the March 1964 Geneva auto show. Its success ensured the company’s survival, establishing it as a viable competitor with sports car maker Ferrari S.p.A. After the testing of his prototype Lamborghini engine in May 1963, Giotto Bizzarrini left the company, and the following month Ferruccio Lamborghini assigned Gian Paolo Dallara — with the assistance of Paolo Stanzani and Bob Wallace — the task of developing a production version of the grand tourer. (via)

7 months ago
I’m not interested in writing short stories. Anything that doesn’t take years of your life and drive you to suicide hardly seems worth doing. Cite Arrow Cormac McCarthy
7 months ago

gutsanduppercuts: Bruce Lee’s test shots for a proposed period piece he had planned. He wanted to make a true kung fu masterpiece but when he asked for an exuberant amount of money for the time, the studio (Shaw Brothers) backed out.

I can only imagine what could have come out of it. Even these still pictures exude a certain air of being very special.

7 months ago
Got my hands on this deck by Geoff McFetridge.

Got my hands on this deck by Geoff McFetridge.

7 months ago
New blade.

New blade.